Spooon! Peter Serafinowicz to play superhero the Tick in Amazon pilot

The dimwitted blue-clad superhero will reportedly return to our screens following previous appearances in cult comics and TV.

Patrick Warburton as the Tick in the 2001 show.

Sony Pictures Television

Forget Batman and Superman. Forget Iron Man and Captain America. The greatest superhero showdown is yet to come.

Yes, the Tick is returning to our screens, and gravel-voiced British comic actor Peter Serafinowicz will squeeze into the blue bodysuit of the cult character, Deadline reports.

Antennaed and none-too-bright superhero the Tick began life in 1986 as the mascot for a Massachusetts comic shop. The Tick, created by Ben Edlund, was supported over the years by an absurd cast of characters, including Paul the Samurai, American Maid, Batmanuel and Man-Eating Cow, in a comic, an animated series in 1994 and a live action show in 2001. The cartoon ran three seasons, while the live action version, with Patrick Warburton in the lead role, assumed cult status despite lasting only nine episodes.

Deadline reports Serafinowicz will don the blue costume in an Amazon pilot episode directed by Wally Pfister, director of "Transcendence" and cinematographer for Christopher Nolan's "Dark Knight" movies.

Liverpool-born comic actor and voice-over artist Serafinowicz, 43, has appeared in films including "Guardians of the Galaxy" and "Shawn of the Dead". He's appeared in TV shows from "Spaced" and "I'm Alan Partridge" to "Parks and Recreation", lending his voice to "South Park" and "Archer" along the way. Oh, and he was the voice of Darth Maul in "Star Wars: The Phantom Menace".

British actor Peter Serafinowicz attends the "Spy" New York Premiere.

Joe Stevens/Retna

Stand-up comic and actor Griffin Newman, currently appearing in "Vinyl" on HBO, will reportedly play the Tick's hapless sidekick Arthur.

Although the revival hasn't been officially confirmed by Amazon or by Serafinowicz, the actor did retweet the Deadline report.

Amazon produces pilot episodes in batches and, unlike traditional television broadcasters, invites the public to vote on which ones they like. Pilots earning decent feedback are then made into fun shows that are made available to subscribers via Amazon Instant Video.

Previous successful pilots include "The Man in the High Castle" and the multi-award-winning "Transparent".

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