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Spider-Man: Far From Home Easter eggs you may have missed

The latest Spidey adventure, out now on home release, references the past and the future, from villains in the comics to a possible return of a major superhero team.

Tom Holland (Finalized);Jake Gyllenhaal (Finalized)

Spider-Man: Far From Home had plenty of Easter eggs to catch if you were paying attention. 

Sony Pictures

Spider-Man: Far From Home wouldn't be a proper Marvel movie if it wasn't full of Easter eggs. The subtle references run the gamut from mentions of characters from other Marvel Cinematic Universe films to specific comic book issues related to the film. 

As Far From Home is out now digitally and arrives Oct. 1 on DVD and Blu-ray, here's a roundup of the movie's Easter eggs and how they connect the MCU to the comics.

There are plenty of Far From Home spoilers below, so consider this your spoiler warning.  

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Who's thirsty for Hydro-Man?

After the kids survive the Water Elemental's attack on Venice, one of them mentions a Buzzfeed article reporting on a man named Morris Bench, who has water powers. That's the same name as Hydro-Man, a Spider-Man villain who can transform his body into water. Bench is considered one of Spidey's low-tier bad guys who typically runs with groups of other weak villains. 

BFP

Peter's uncle, Ben Parker, gets mentioned only minimally in the two MCU Spider-Man films, and in Far From Home he only gets a nod when the initials "BFP" appear on a suitcase. The initials reference Uncle Ben's full name, Benjamin Franklin Parker. 

In the latest episode of Fat Man Beyond, co-host Mark Bernardin pointed out the suitcase is a metaphor for the "baggage" Peter is carrying over his dead uncle. That baggage is then gone by the end of the movie. 

Earth-616 and 833

As referenced in my CNET colleague Roger Cheng's roundup of our biggest Far From Home WTF questions, Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) says he came from a destroyed Earth-833 to help save Earth-616. Although that proved to be a lie, 616 is the designation for Earth in the Marvel comics. Earth-833 is an alternate universe first mentioned in the Spider-Verse event in the comics as the home of Spider-Man UK. Marvel considers the MCU to be Earth-199999.

Betty Brant introduces Phase 4

After the "touching" tribute to Tony Stark and Captain America, Betty Brant (Angourie Rice) briefly mentions that "we're moving on to a new phase of our lives." The timing is spot on as Phase 4 of the MCU will go beyond the two mainstays in the upcoming films. For those wondering about Brant herself, in the comics, she's J. Jonah Jameson's (J.K. Simmons) secretary and one of Peter Parker's love interests before marrying Mary-Jane Watson. 

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Now with Cap' out of the way, Chris Evans can return as Johnny Storm. 

20th Century Fox

More 4? 

There's an advertisement with the numbers "1, 2, 3" and the words "Something big is coming" in the background of one of the shots in the first postcredits scene. This could be another reference to MCU's Phase 4, but the numbers have circles around them. The number 4 with a circle around it is the symbol for the Fantastic Four, which is now a Disney property. Could this be referencing the superhero team coming back for a third time, but this time in the MCU? Or could that ad simply be a regular New York City ad? 

Dr. Selvig is a TV star

Dr. Eric Selvig (Stellan Skarsgård) played a major role in the first two Thor films and the first Avengers film. Since then, the astrophysicist appeared on the educational TV series Nova as indicated by the film choices Peter scanned on the flight to Venice. Dr. Selvig is on the display cover for Nova: Einstein Rosen Bridges.

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Who owns The Daily Bugle?

When J. Jonah Jameson reveals on TV that Peter Parker (Tom Holland) is Spider-Man, off to the side is the logo for The Daily Bugle, which contains its URL TheDailyBugle.net. The address leads to nowhere, but a quick check of the domain on WhoIs shows it's registered to Sony Pictures. 

Issues with license plates

Scattered throughout the movie are license plates referencing the comics. One is "AMF-1562" or Amazing Fantasy #15, Spider-Man's origin comic released in 1962. 

Another is "TASM-143," which would be The Amazing Spider-Man #143. That issue introduced the Cyclone, a low-tier bad guy, but also had a cameo of Gwen Stacy who was killed off in the comics years prior. This would be one of several issues setting up the introduction of the Jackal who cloned both Gwen Stacy and Spider-Man

"ASM 212" was written on a boat in Venice and is The Amazing Spider-Man #212, which marked the first appearance of Hydro-Man. A partial license plate near the beginning shows "ASM 463," which would be The Amazing Spider-Man #4 released in 1963 and was the debut of Sandman. Then there's "ASM 28965," or The Amazing Spider-Man #28 that featured the first appearance of Molten Man in 1965. For those paying attention, these four comics featuring the first appearance low-tier bad guys also references the four elementals seen in the film: earth, water, wind and fire. 

Originally published on July 8.