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My favorite trending videos on YouTube right now

This week's collection of YouTube videos features everything from an underwater sea-life battle to a soccer ball hitting a guy in the head in extreme slow motion.

Once again, it's time to check out what's happening over at YouTube!

Ever since I started writing posts relating to the various social networks, I make it a point to visit YouTube to see what's trending and then share a grab bag of videos every Thursday. These videos don't follow any specific theme besides the fact I found them interesting or funny, but I guarantee at least a slight raising of your heart rate, or maybe a chuckle. (Exhaling loudly through your nose counts!)

First up, TheBackyardScientist decided it was a good idea to see what happens when you heat up a cannonball and drop it through a Styrofoam tower. Why, you might ask? Who cares why! You know you want to watch it:

Next, a video from Matt Stonie, as he creates an epic tower of French toast. This is not your run-of-the-mill Sunday morning French toast, mind you. Stonie goes big with standard French toast, cinnamon French toast, and Cinnamon Toast Crunch-encrusted French toast for a grand total of three dozen pieces. The craziest thing about it? He eats the whole thing! (Warning: There is some profanity, but how do you not let a few words slip when eating 36 pieces of French toast?)

Up next from National Geographic, a snorkeler in Hawaii comes across a battle between an octopus and an eel. The battle is described with captions on screen as you watch the action and fortunately neither were hurt (permanently), but it has a surprise ending!

Finally, from one of my favorites, The Slo Mo Guys, you get to see a soccer ball (football) hit someone in the head. But what's especially cool is that the camera is recording at 28,000 frames per second.