CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Tech Industry

Roundup: Autobytel, NetScout top expectations

    Autobytel.com (Nasdaq: ABTL) beat its own preannouncement in the first quarter.

    After market close Thursday, the online network for buying cars reported a first quarter net loss of $8.1 million, or 42 cents per share. The company earlier this month said it expected to report a loss ranging between 43 and 45 cents per share.

    First quarter revenue reached $15.1 million, up 88 percent year-over-year and up 21 percent sequentially. That was slightly higher than the company indicated in its preannouncement.

    International fees and licenses totaled $1.3 million in revenue, a 120 percent gain from the fourth quarter. That overseas business, along with services such as financing and insurance, generated 20 percent of Autobytel.com's revenue, compared to 15 percent in the fourth quarter.

    The company said its cash position remains solid with almost $107 million in cash. Although Autobytel.com expects a second quarter cash burn ranging between $10 million and $12 million, that quarterly figure will halve in the second half of 2000, the company said.

    Shares of Autobytel.com closed Thursday's regular trading at 6, down 1/4 for the session.

    Other companies reporting quarterly results Thursday:

  • Pilot Networks
  • (Nasdaq: PILT) met analyst estimates in the fourth quarter.

    The provider of e-business services lost $5.7 million, or 38 cents per share, in the fiscal fourth quarter. That was in line with First Call consensus.

    Fourth quarter evenue rose 89 percent year-over-year to $10.5 million. Gross margin rose to 12 percent from 3 percent in the third quarter.

    For the full fiscal 2000, Pilot lost $21.7 million, or $1.55 per share, on revenue of $31.9 million.

  • Open Text
  • (Nasdaq: OTEX) met analyst estimates in the third quarter.

    The maker of software that helps employees share information reporter fiscal third quarter net income of $140,000, or a penny per share, excluding amortization and one-time events. That was in line with First Call consensus.

    Including all events, the company earned $4.4 million, or 19 cents per share.

    Third quarter revenue rose to $28.5 million, up 7 percent sequentially and up 28 percent year-over-year.

  • NetScout Systems
  • (Nasdaq: NTCT) beat the consensus forecast in the fourth quarter.

    The provider of network performance monitoring technology reported fiscal fourth quarter net income of $4.5 million, or 16 cents per share. First Call consensus predicted a profit of 12 cents per share.

    Fourth quarter revenue incresaed 28 percent year-over-year to $23.9 million.

    For the full fiscal 2000, NetScout earned $15.2 million, or 56 cents per share, on revenue of $86.2 million.

  • Agency.com
  • (Nasdaq: ACOM) surprised Wall Street in reporting an operating profit in the first quarter as revenues rose a stronger-than-expected 82 percent on a pro forma basis.

    The Internet consulting firm said it earned, $700,000, or 2 cents a share, excluding goodwill and amortization. In the year-ago period, it lost $2.6 million, or 9 cents a share, on a pro forma basis, which includes the results of certain acquisitions.

    Wall Street analysts had expected the company, which helps clients develop Internet business models and implement technology, to post a loss of 3 cents, excluding goodwill, according to First Call. The company had not been expected to turn profitable on an operating basis until the third quarter.

    Revenue grew to $38.5 million from $21.1 million for the quarter, beating Wall Street estimates by 20 percent, amid strong demand for its Web expertise and new business in its emerging interactive television and wireless services.

    Its net loss, including non-cash items, amortization and goodwill, narrowed to $4.2 million, or 12 cents a share, from $7.7 million, or 28 cents a share.

  • Hoovers
  • (Nasdaq: HOOV) reported a lower-than-expected fourth quarter loss of 15 cents a share.

    For the three months ended March 31 the online business information and electronic commerce gateway lost about $1.8 million, as opposed to a pro-forma loss of $347,000 a year ago, when the company was not publicly traded. Susan White, an analyst with J.P. Morgan, which helped shepherd the company into the public market in July 1999, expected the company to lose 19 cents for the quarter, according to First Call.

    Revenue more than doubled to about $6.6 million from $3.1 million a year ago, spurred on by a surge in advertising revenue and electronic commerce fees.

    However, faster-than-expected growth in revenues and subscribers to the Austin-based services prompted the company to move up its estimated date it expects to turn a profit.

    Company executives said Hoovers expects to be profitable by March 2001 instead of by the summer, as first anticipated, because of faster-than-expected revenue growth and improved gross margin.

    For the year, Hoover's reported $19 million in revenue, up 106 percent from $9.2 million in fiscal 1999. It posted a $9.528 million full-year loss, or 88 cents per share.

  • theglobe.com
  • (Nasdaq: TGLO) also lost less than analysts expected in the March quarter.

    The online community operator reported a first quarter net loss of $7.6 million, or 31 cents per share, excluding amortization and special charges. A survey of four analysts by Zacks Investment Research predicted a loss of 47 cents per share.

    First quarter revenue increased 119 percent year-over-year to $7 million.

  • Snowball.com
  • (Nasdaq: SNOW) missed analyst estimates in its first quarter as a publicly-traded company.

    The Web portal operator reported a first quarter pro forma net loss of $18.2 million, or 67 cents per share, excluding amortization and special charges. First Call's survey of three analysts predicted a loss of 65 cents per share.

    Including all expenses, Snowball.com lost $21.9 million, or 80 cents per share.

    First quarter revenue rose to $4.6 million, up 411 percent from the first quarter of 1999, when Snowball began operations. The company went public in March.

  • E-Loan
  • (Nasdaq: EELN) topped the consensus forecast in the first quarter.

    The online lender lost $11.4 million, or 27 cents per share, excluding special charges and amortization. First Call consensus predicted a loss of 29 cents per share.

    Revenue in the first quarter rose 48 percent year-over-year to $7.1 million.

  • NetObjects
  • (Nasdaq: NETO) met analysts' bottom line estimates in the second quarter.

    The provider of software and services for online business reported a fiscal second quarter loss of $4.3 million, or 15 cents per share, excluding amortization. That was in line with First Call estimates.

    Including all costs, NetObjects lost $6.4 million, or 23 cents per share.

    Second quarter revenue increased 137 percent year-over-year to $8 million.>