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Porn giant joins protest against North Carolina transgender law

XHamster.com is showing users in the Tar Heel state blank screens instead of the usual fare of videos and photos.

No porn for you, North Carolina.

Screenshot/Jennifer Van Grove/CNET

North Carolina's controversial new transgender law is facing even stiffer opposition.

Popular porn website XHamster.com began turning away users based in North Carolina on Monday, joining protests against a state law that forces transgender public school and university students to use bathrooms according to their biological sex.

Instead of the usual fare of risqué videos, photos and stories, users with IP addresses in North Carolina instead see a blank screen.

XHamster representatives did not immediately respond to a request for comment but told PerezHilton.com that move was in protest of the new law, which many fear could be used to discriminate against people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.

As of today, access to XHamster.com is blacked out in the state of North Carolina until further notice. Judging by the stats of what you North Carolinians watch, we feel this punishment is a severe one. We will not standby and pump revenue into a system that promotes this type of garbage. We respect all sexualities and embrace them.

The office of North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory did not respond to a request for comment.

The tech community has come out in fierce opposition of the new law, which McCrory signed last month. More than 90 business executives, including the CEOs of Apple, Facebook, Twitter and Salesforce.com, have signed a letter demanding the law be repealed, calling it discriminatory against transgender students because it forces them to use school toilets "inconsistent with their gender identity."

In addition to porn and a Bruce Springsteen concert, the law is also costing the state jobs. In response to the new law, online payments company PayPal last week scrapped plans to open a new 400-person global operations center in North Carolina. Several companies have also moved to curb their business with the state, including filmmaker Lionsgate pulling production of a new Hulu show from Charlotte.

A federal lawsuit filed last month challenges the constitutionality if the new law, and the Obama administration is weighing whether to cut billions of dollars in funding to the state.