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Photos: Bike design works the angles

The Shift, from industrial designers at Purdue, angles its wheels to match the speed at which you pedal.

    Bike design works the angles

    This design from a team at Purdue University took first place in the 9th International Bicycle Design Competition. Called Shift, it's meant to help toddlers get their bearings and keep their balance when learning how to pedal on their own.

    Credit: Purdue University

    2004 winner

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    Bike design works the angles

    Purdue professors Scott Shim (left) and Steve Visser review the design of the Shift.

    Credit: Purdue News Service/David Umberger

    Scott Shim and Steve Visser

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    Bike design works the angles

    As the Shift picks up speed, its wheels gradually change their alignment. The back wheels start with a wide base when stationary or moving slowly and then essentially become a single wheel when the bike is moving faster.

    Credit: Purdue University

    How SHIFT works

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    Bike design works the angles

    The PD3, also a tricycle design, was the second-place finisher in the Taiwan competition. It's meant for mail carriers, though it looks like it would work for hot dog vendors as well.

    Credit: International Bicycle Design Competition

    Second place

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    Bike design works the angles

    Third place went to the Hybrid, which supplements leg power with a small electric engine. The batteries are charged by the pedaling.

    Credit: International Bicycle Design Competition

    third place

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    Bike design works the angles

    The 2003 winner of the International Bicycle Design Competition was the Xiclet, developed by Marcelo Martinelli of Argentina.

    Credit: International Bicycle Design Competition

    2004 winner

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