CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Stimulus executive order signed Unemployment benefits update 2020 Perseid meteor shower French's Mustard Beer Trump bans TikTok New Apple 27-inch iMac

Philips lets drivers talk to their cars

Talking to your car may soon be as commonplace as talking on your cell phone. Philips Speech Processing, a division of Philips Electronics North America, is making its contribution with a series of speech-enabled applications for automobiles. The company will unveil them at the upcoming CTIA Wireless 2001 conference from March 20 to 22 at the Sands Expo & Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas. At the conference, Philips will demonstrate speech-enabled directory assistance, voice-activated voicemail, a speech-enabled restaurant guide, voice-driven weather reports, speech-enabled call routing and other wireless speech-driven technology. The software will be demonstrated from the driver's seat of a 2001 Saab.

Talking to your car may soon be as commonplace as talking on your cell phone. Philips Speech Processing, a division of Philips Electronics North America, is making its contribution with a series of speech-enabled applications for automobiles. The company will unveil them at the upcoming CTIA Wireless 2001 conference from March 20 to 22 at the Sands Expo & Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas.

At the conference, Philips will demonstrate speech-enabled directory assistance, voice-activated voicemail, a speech-enabled restaurant guide, voice-driven weather reports, speech-enabled call routing and other wireless speech-driven technology. The software will be demonstrated from the driver's seat of a 2001 Saab.