CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Culture

Palm group gets hand slapped

What started as an effort by one handheld enthusiast to link Palm users around the world has inadvertently turned up the heat on a long-simmering border dispute.

    What started as an effort by one handheld enthusiast to link Palm users around the world has inadvertently turned up the heat on a long-simmering border dispute.

    Michael Ashby launched InterPUG in 1999 as a way of connecting Palm user groups across the globe. However, an error in a map on its Web site has gotten the organization into some hot water with its Turkish contingent.

    InterPUG's site mistakenly included the European portion of Turkey as part of Greece, an error exacerbated by the fact that the two neighboring countries have long had disputes over borders.

    Turkish handheld Web site Mobildunya launched an e-mail protest against InterPUG.

    "We all know that this kind of faulty information may exist all over the Internet, and it does not need to be intentional, but I would like to inform you that on the regional map you publish, a material portion of Turkey seems to be in Greece," the group says in a sample protest letter posted on its Web site. "I don't know where you are from, but I wonder what you would feel if some part of your country was shown as part of another country. I am positive that you will take care of the issue. Thanks in advance for your concern."

    Ashby said Tuesday that the volunteer-run organization, whose maps also appear on the user-group portion of the Palm.com Web site, is working to have the maps corrected by the end of the day.

    "It was totally done out of ignorance and was not intentional," Ashby said. "When you are an American and are trying to remember your high school geography class...you are bound to make an error somewhere."

    Ashby said this was the first significant blunder in the maps, although there have been some misspellings. He said the group had received about 50 protest e-mails.

    "This is about as racy as it gets for Palm user groups," Ashby said.