CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Cats movie trailer Rise of Skywalker footage Impossible Whopper Half-Life: Alyx Walmart Black Friday 2019 Early Black Friday Deals

Optus taken to court for allegedly misleading 20,000 customers

Australia's Competition and Consumer Commission said Optus misinformed customers about how much time they had to join the NBN.

Optus To Cut 350 Jobs
Scott Barbour/Getty Images

Friday brings another controversy surrounding the NBN -- but this time the finger is being pointed at Optus.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission announced it's taking Optus to court, alleging the telco misled customers on their need to join the NBN.

Between October 2015 and March 2017, the ACCC said, Optus contacted thousands of its customers telling them it would soon disconnect their existing Hybrid Fibre Coaxial (HFC) as NBN was about to be implemented in their areas. However, the time frame Optus pressed on customers was earlier than the company was contractually allowed to cancel their services, according to the ACCC. 

The ACCC also alleged Optus misinformed many of its customers during October 2015 and September 2016, leading its customers to believe they had to switch to its NBN service, when service from any telco would have done. 

"We allege that Optus' misrepresentations put pressure on customers to move to the NBN sooner than they were required to," ACCC Chairman Rod Sims said. "This is particularly concerning as Optus received a significant financial payment from NBN Co for each customer that moved from its cable network to the NBN." 

"The ACCC's action today relates to past processes that we have successfully addressed," an Optus spokesperson said, noting the company "compensated customers who had been disconnected without sufficient notice.

"We are working cooperatively with the ACCC to resolve its concerns."  

Now playing: Watch this: Why your NBN is so slow -- explained with toy cars!
2:43

Rebooting the Reef: CNET dives deep into how tech can help save Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

The Smartest Stuff: Innovators are thinking up new ways to make you -- and the world around you -- smarter.