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Openwave, Sun go Java for wireless

The makers of the Web browser that sits on an estimated 70 million cell phones is now working with Sun Microsystems to add Java applications to the browser's stable of offerings. The deal between Sun and Openwave Systems might lure Java developers into the wireless world, and it sets up Openwave for a chance at winning the rights to be the browser for the Java-enabled phones expected from most of the major handset makersMore developers working on applications could help to prove pivotal in bringing to the wireless Web the graphics, images and even moving pictures that it sorely needs to finally win over a skeptical public, according to some analysts briefed on the Openwave/Sun announcement.There is a Java-enabled cell phone from NTT DoCoMo already on the market. But its browser is not from Openwave.

The makers of the Web browser that sits on an estimated 70 million cell phones is now working with Sun Microsystems to add Java applications to the browser's stable of offerings. The deal between Sun and Openwave Systems might lure Java developers into the wireless world, and it sets up Openwave for a chance at winning the rights to be the browser for the Java-enabled phones expected from most of the major handset makers

More developers working on applications could help to prove pivotal in bringing to the wireless Web the graphics, images and even moving pictures that it sorely needs to finally win over a skeptical public, according to some analysts briefed on the Openwave/Sun announcement.There is a Java-enabled cell phone from NTT DoCoMo already on the market. But its browser is not from Openwave.