Check your privacy filters: Facebook could be the new LinkedIn

Facebook's new Jobs page lets you search for work opportunities and even apply without having to leave the page.

Culture
Facebook

Facebook isn't just for wasting time in the office. It can now help you find a new job entirely.

The social network has unveiled a Jobs page, which allows businesses to list all kinds of work for you to find. You can even apply for the job and make contact with recruiters directly through Facebook.

This could be seen as a challenge to competing services such as LinkedIn, the recruiting network acquired by Microsoft last December. But while LinkedIn is entirely focused on business, Facebook's social aspects could make it easier for potential employers to trawl your profile for details of your personal life.

It's yet another expansion for Facebook beyond the activities that occupy so many of its 1.2 billion daily users, such as posting vacation selfies, keeping up with college friends, watching videos and weighing in on hot-button political issues. Its technological ambitions range from artificial intelligence and virtual reality to finding ways to get internet service to remote parts of the globe.

In late 2015, Facebook pushed into Craigslist territory with Marketplace, a new section of its mobile app that lets people list their furniture, cars and clothes for sale to Facebook users in their area. Last November, it launched Gameroom, a PC gaming platform that takes aim at Steam.

Facebook cited the simplicity of its new jobs system, which it began testing several months ago, as a boon for those looking for a new workplace.

"Job posts may appear in their News Feed, in the new bookmark for jobs, and alongside other posts on business pages," Facebook's blog post reads. "When [applicants] click on the Apply Now button, a form will open that's pre-populated with information from their profile."

The jobs service will only be available in the US and Canada at launch. Facebook did not immediately reply to a request for comment on whether there are plans for a global rollout.

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