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Nintendo 64 Classic may be on its way, trademark reveals

Trademarks, logos and hope: is another classic Nintendo console making a comeback?

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Yvonne Hemsey/Getty Images

When Nintendo first announced it was making miniature versions of its classic game consoles, the internet lost it. The original NES Classic was a hit before it even launched. A year later, the company created the Super Nintendo Classic edition, and started a trend. Today, these throwback consoles are more than just nostalgic toys -- they're the primary way Nintendo expects its customers to play its classic game library.

So what's next for the company's Classic Edition line up?

The Nintendo 64. Probably. A few days ago, JapaneseNintendo spotted a trademark application that covers both the controllers and software for the 1996 game console. Actually, it's technically the second 64-bit console trademark the company's filed recently -- last summer, Nintendo filed a graphical trademark for an icon depicting the N64's iconic three-pronged controller in the same style as the NES Classic logo.

Now Playing: Watch this: Top 5 Nintendo 64 Classic features we want
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That's exciting, but it's not a guarantee that a Nintendo 64 Classic is on the way. Companies like Nintendo routinely register trademarks for prospective and older products to protect their intellectual property. 

On top of that, an N64 Classic could be one of the hardest throwback consoles for Nintendo to produce: Many of the game's most iconic titles -- GoldenEye, Donkey Kong 64, Banjo-Kazooie, Perfect Dark -- were developed by Rare, a studio now owned by Microsoft, one of Nintendo's biggest competitors.

Still, if Nintendo can hammer out the rights issues, we'd definitely be down for a few rounds of power weapons on Facility.

NES Classic: Your childhood in a brilliant little box.

SNES Classic: Nostalgia this perfect is a rare thing.