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Netgear adds DSL modem to dual-band router

Netgear introduces a new dual-band wireless router that has a built-in DSL modem.

The RangeMax Dual Band Wireless-N Router + DSL Modem DGND3300 from Netgear. Dong Ngo/CBS Interactive

If you sign up for a DSL Internet service, chances are you will be offered a router and modem combo device.

I would normally recommend against this kind of combo deal, as it doesn't provide the flexibility of choosing the right router for the network. That's not to mention that the combo router offered by the service provider tends to be subpar, in both performance and features. It's much more flexible to get just the modem and add a separate wireless router later.

Now I am about to change that mentality with what Netgear introduced at CES this year, the RangeMax Dual Band Wireless-N Router + DSL Modem DGND3300. It's because the router part of the device offers most of what you would look for in any separate router.

The DGND3300 looks basically the same as the WNDR3300 with one exception: instead of a WAN port (that works with cable and DSL modem) it has a telephone port so that you can just plug the phone line right in. According to Netgear, the router features a built-in DSL2+ modem and will work with most DSL services.

The DGND3300 is probably the first router/modem combo device that features concurrent dual-band wireless, meaning it can work in both 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz frequencies at the same time.

Some other features of the DGND3300 include:

  • Automatic quality of service
  • Eight internal smart antennas
  • Wi-Fi protected setup with a push button that allows for quickly adding wireless client to the network
  • Automatically upgrades to the latest router firmware
  • Convenient on/off switch helps save energy when not in use
  • Efficient Energy Star compliant power supply
  • Made out of 80 percent recycled materials

The The RangeMax Dual Band Wireless-N Router + DSL Modem DGND3300 seems a good choice when you want to cut down the amount of devices (and wires) in your tight office corner. And for now, it might just be the only solution that doesn't compromise advanced wireless networking features and performance.

The router will be available during the first quarter of the year and will cost about $169.

The back of the router shows its telephone port that takes the place of a WAN port. Netgear