Meet your new Monopoly tokens: Quack! Rawr!

Monopoly fans show several old tokens the door and replace them with a feathered friend, a tub toy and an extinct creature.

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Wave your tiny arms in the air and celebrate. The T. rex dinosaur will be one of three new tokens destined for the next generation of the Monopoly board game. The Cretaceous-period predator joins newcomers rubber ducky and penguin alongside the traditional favorites of the Scottie dog, top hat, car, battleship and cat (which joined the game in 2013).

Hasbro teased the coming of new tokens in February when it kicked the thimble token out of the game, but we had to wait until today to find out the other victims of an online fan vote from earlier this year. The two other departing pieces are the boot and the wheelbarrow. The announcement comes just ahead of World Monopoly Day on March 19.

Fans from 146 countries whittled down the winners from 64 possibilities. The Scottie dog walked away with the most votes with 212,476, followed closely by the T. rex with 207,954. The classic hat and car came next, with the ducky, cat, penguin and battleship rounding out the top list. A tortoise token moved just a little too slow to make the final cut.

The least popular token was a rain boot, which pulled in a mere 7,239 votes. Those of us who feared the arrival of emoji tokens needn't have worried. Mr. M Emoji, a stylized version of the Rich Uncle Pennybags mascot, was the highest-voted emoji option with 74,708. The hashtag symbol got 73,139 votes, which seems to indicate that Monopoly fans want to keep the internet off their game boards.

The refreshed group of tokens will arrive on store shelves with the newest Monopoly game this fall.

What do the new tokens tell us about our world today? We're not as into sewing, gardening and old-school footwear as we used to be, but we still really like cute animals, bubble baths and "Jurassic Park."

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