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Missile Command's 30-year record smashed

After a 56-hour marathon, challenger Victor Sandberg has beaten the Missile Command record set by Victor Ali in 1982.

Just moments before finishing.
(Screenshot by Michelle Starr/CNET Australia)

After a 56-hour marathon, challenger Victor Sandberg has beaten the Missile Command record set by Victor Ali in 1982.

Maybe 2013 is a year for beating old-school arcade video-game records. Just a month ago, gamer George Leutz made his third attempt at the Q*bert crown, finally walking away victorious after 80 hours at the controls.

This time, it's Swedish gamer Victor Sandberg, aka diskborsteMC on Twitch.tv. Unlike Leutz, whose attempt was publicised, Sandberg kind of slipped in under the radar with just five videos on his Twitch channel — three videos of prior attempts at the world record, beginning 26 December 2012, and the two videos of his final, successful attempt.

His Moby Dick was Victor Ali, who, in December 1982, took the world record after around 56 hours of gameplay with 80,364,995 points.

Sandberg began his marathon on 15 March, streaming live on Twitch. His strategy? Setting up spare cities that could be destroyed as a decoy so that he was able to take bathroom breaks, finishing up just over 56 hours — and pipping Ali at the post with 81,796,035 points.

His record will need to be confirmed, of course, but you can watch him arrive at the finish line yourself in the Twitch recording below. Skip to the end if you don't want to watch the whole thing.

Via arstechnica.com