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Judge: Case closed

A federal judge largely approves a proposed settlement in the years-old antitrust case. The government praises the decision, while critics say the case should have looked at what Microsoft's up to now.

Microsoft gets settlement nod; states could appeal

By CNET News.com Staff
November 4, 2002, 12:15 PM PT

A federal judge largely approves a proposed settlement in the years-old antitrust case. The government praises the decision, while critics say the case should have looked at what Microsoft's up to now. But it may not be completely over just yet; the remaining states could appeal, and European officials are continuing a separate investigation.

Is the case finally over?
Unless one side or another decides to appeal, Friday's decision could mark the final chapter in a case once said to be a definitive one for antitrust law.

Shares jump on settlement nod
Microsoft shares jump more than 7 percent as Wall Street applauds the approval of a settlement deal. The technology-heavy Nasdaq jumps nearly 4 percent.

Ruling may blunt other cases
The antitrust ruling may have gutted many pending private lawsuits against Microsoft, but cases in California and Europe still pose a danger.

Looking ahead to European resolution
The software giant hopes to use its recent antitrust victory as a starting point for resolving legal troubles in Europe.

Settlement gets judge's OK
U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly approves the settlement almost wholesale, basically rejecting the states' call for stiffer sanctions.

Rivals come up short
The federal judge says rejected harsh antitrust punishments for Microsoft because they would unfairly benefit its competitors.

Commentary: Machiavelli and Microsoft
When it came to her final word on Microsoft, a federal judge turns to Niccolo Machiavelli's famous Renaissance treatise on power politics for direction.

Redmond's multiple personalities
Four years after the government charged Microsoft with violating antitrust laws, the company has grown richer and more influential.

Key players: Where are they now?
As the Microsoft antitrust trial dragged on, some of the most influential people involved moved on. Here's where some key players have gone.

Microsoft's reprieve: Breakup avoided
An appeals court sends an order to break up the software giant back to a lower court. The appeals court rules that the trial judge "seriously tainted the proceedings."

Split decision: Microsoft fate in balance
Lawyers for the government and Microsoft come under fire in court. The main question lingers: Will Microsoft be split into two companies?

Breakup: Giant ordered to split
A federal judge decides Microsoft can retain its operating systems business, but must create a separate firm for other software and Internet products.


Executive summary of the decision (PDF)

Final judgment in the antitrust case (PDF)

The memorandum opinion (PDF)


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