Networking

Intel wants partners for new Wi-Fi part

The chipmaker is working on partnerships with consumer electronics makers and content providers to help consumers make better use of an upcoming Wi-Fi component.

SAN JOSE, Calif.--Chipmaker Intel is working on partnerships with consumer electronics makers and content providers to help consumers make better use of an upcoming Wi-Fi component.

Intel representatives, speaking at the Wi-Fi Planet conference here, said the company is sampling its 802.11g/b Wi-Fi part and plans to have it ready for use in its notebook partners' products early next year. Santa Clara, Calif.-based Intel expects its 802.11a/b/g part to begin shipping in the first half of next year.


Get Up to Speed on...
Wi-Fi
Get the latest headlines and
company-specific news in our
expanded GUTS section.


The 802.11g standard allows for much higher throughput than 802.11b. But there's uncertainty about what consumers will do with that extra bandwidth, since many are using Wi-Fi networks simply to access broadband connections wirelessly.

Data transmission rates for 802.11g standard ideally can hit 54 megabits per second, but in reality rates are about half that at best. Still, that's more than enough to support wireless DSL (digital subscriber line) connections, which typically top out at several hundred kilobits per second.

Intel wants to team up with gear makers and content providers to develop and co-market new high-bandwidth applications to be used with networks running 802.11g. One possible use: streaming video on demand from a cable set-top box.

"We want to bring attention to what other uses can be applied with the additional throughput brought in by 'g'," said Julie Coppernoll, a director of marketing in Intel's wireless networking group.

Announcements of partnerships will come as 802.11g parts are available, according to representatives.