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Husband divorces wife because she texted too much after wedding

Technically Incorrect: A few hours after his wedding, a Saudi husband decides his marriage isn't forever -- his new wife's phone got in the way.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


Texting can wait. This is love we're talking about.

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Marriages break down.

Whether the hopes were too high or the expectations too low, an imbalance occurs and lawyers are called in.

A smaller proportion of marriages break down in the immediate hours after the ceremony. Even fewer, I suspect, do so because of a gadget.

In Saudi Arabia, however, a newlywed husband was reportedly distraught when his attempts at carnal proximity with his wife were thwarted by her need to text her friends.

As Gulf News reports, relying on a story in Saudi newspaper Al Watan, divorce proceedings have already begun.

The tale, as told by one of the groom's relatives, is that the happy couple went back to their hotel room.

"As soon as the bride was in the room, she kept using her mobile," the relative told Al Watan. "Her groom tried to get closer with her and become more intimate, but he was shocked when she ignored him, not responding to his words and action."

Wedding nights can be tricky. Great promises have been made. Vast emotions swirl. Heads are giddy. Minds malfunction.

In this case, though, the wife was busy texting her friends. The husband asked his wife to please stop with the texting.

And then came the painful blow. In the relative's words, "When he asked her if her friends were more important than he was, the bride answered that they were."

This is, indeed, one way of establishing whether someone really cares about you.

Do they text you? How quickly do they reply after you text them? Do they text you from the movies, the ball game or even when they're having sex? Do they text you on their wedding night?

In Saudi Arabia, the rate of failed marriages is said to hover at around 30 percent. Which suggests a 70 percent "success" rate.

Yet as technology traces its Genghis-like path through culture, it seems clear that it represents a new threat to connubial bliss.

A hint, then: As part of your wedding vows, promise you'll put away your phones for at least a week after the wedding.

I know it won't be easy. You'll have to talk to each other. But it's good practice for your blissful future, believe me.