CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Mobile

Huawei asks court to rule US ban unconstitutional

The Chinese company heads to court once more after the US government deemed its equipment a security threat.

CHINA-US-TELECOMMUNICATION-ESPIONAGE-COURT-HUAWEI

Song Liuping, chief legal officer of Chinese tech giant Huawei, at a press conference in Shenzhen on Tuesday.

Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Huawei is delving deeper into its battle with the US government.

The Chinese telecommunications giant filed a motion in US court on Tuesday to throw out US legislation that bars federal agencies from buying its products. The motion for summary judgment asks the court to rule on the constitutionality of Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that limits Huawei's sales of telecom equipment.

Now playing: Watch this: What is going on between Huawei and the US?
4:59

"The fact is, the US government has provided no evidence to show that Huawei is a security threat. There is no gun, no smoke. Only speculation," said Dr. Song Liuping, Huawei's chief legal officer, at the Shenzhen press conference on Tuesday.

"We hope that mistakes in the NDAA can be corrected by the court."

Huawei launched its lawsuit against the US in March, after the company was scarred by scandal over concerns it poses security threats from the Chinese government. The company was added to the US Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security Entity List earlier this month, following an executive order from President Donald Trump effectively banning Huawei from US communications networks.

"Politicians in the US are using the strength of an entire nation to come after a private company." Song said. "This is not normal."