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HTC unveils larger-screened One M9+ phone in China

The new phone aims to outdo the regular M9 by sporting a 5.2-inch screen, dual rear cameras and a fingerprint sensor.

htconem9plus.jpg
HTC is launching the HTC One M9+ to Chinese consumers. HTC

HTC will launch a bigger and beefier version of its upcoming M9 phone in China. But don't get too excited if you live in North America or Europe.

Announced Wednesday in a blog post, the HTC One M9+ offers a 5.2-inch screen with 2K resolution and is powered by a 2.2GHz MediaTek Helio X10 octa-core processor. The phone also comes with the 20-megapixel Duo Camera, which offers a second camera lens to help capture more detailed photos, a feature currently found on the HTC One M8 .

Already blasting the sound on the M8, the HTC BoomSound feature amps up the volume on the front-facing speakers for the M9+. As another draw, a fingerprint sensor is positioned on the front of the phone so that you can lock and unlock it. The sensor is capable of detecting your fingerprint from any direction, according to HTC.

HTC is clearly aiming the M9+ toward Chinese consumers craving a bigger and more feature-packed version of the standard M9, which comes with a 5-inch screen, a single rear camera and no fingerprint sensor. The company is also trying to compete in the high-end smartphone arena with Apple's new iPhone lineup and Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S6 phones.

But apparently the phone's potential audience will be limited. In a statement sent to Engadget, HTC said that the M9+ is "not currently planned to be released in North America or Europe, where we believe our flagship HTC One M9 is the best choice." China is the world's largest smartphone market, though, with almost 520 million users.

HTC didn't reveal a launch date or price for the M9+. The HTC One M9 will reach consumers this Friday. That's the same date Samsung's new Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge phones go on sale.

HTC did not immediately respond to CNET's request for comment.