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Hijacked planes vs. cyberprivacy? No contest

A News.com reader writes that people who are preoccupied about privacy from government monitoring and the like are those who typically have something to hide.

 

  
Hijacked planes vs. cyberprivacy? No contest

In response to the Sept. 24 column by Mike Yamamoto, "Irrelevancy of the online privacy debate":

I absolutely agree with your editorial about the minuscule price we may pay in privacy as opposed to security. I've always believed that those so preoccupied about privacy from government monitoring and the like are those who typically have something to hide. I don't.

If the CIA, FBI or NSA wanted to waste their time tracking what I do on the Net, fine. Knock yourselves out, I'd say. My only recommendation is that they not waste their time with someone like me. I got nothing to hide.

This also extends to other areas of surveillance. I have no problem whatsoever with video cameras above streets, malls, restaurants, or stadiums or arenas. After all, how are any of the above an invasion of privacy? When you walk into a football stadium with 40,000 other people you are in a very public place. No invasion of privacy there or at a traffic light, either. It's a public road. I get so tired of all this "invasion of privacy" crap.

My concern is to avoid being on a hijacked plane, or blown up while walking past or inside a government building or any building, or dying from some germ warfare virus, or being nuked. The more security there is, the safer and more free I actually feel. At least now.

What I worry about, however, is that after a few years of heightened security, the government will start getting lazy and complacent again, making us vulnerable to some kind of attack. Maybe we should make the most of our travel now while security is improving instead of going downhill.

Marshal Ray
Bowling Green, Ky.