CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Culture

GTE guns for national high-speed Net

Phone giant GTE takes a step closer to offering Net coverage coast to coast, striking agreements with three smaller firms to provide high-speed Internet services.

Phone giant GTE today took a closer step toward offering Net coverage coast to coast, striking agreements with three smaller firms to provide high-speed Internet services.

GTE already operates high-speed Internet access networks in 15 states. But the company now plans to enlist the services of data-focused start-ups Northpoint Communications, Covad Communications, and Jato Communications to offer services on a national level.

The company is following the lead of several other big telephone companies like MCI WorldCom and SBC Communications, which are also trying to expand their high-speed Internet services across the United States. Like GTE, most telecommunications companies are using a combination of their own networks and smaller companies' services to expand their data offerings.

GTE will offer digital subscriber line (DSL) services, a technology that allows existing telephone lines to carry phone calls and high-speed Net access simultaneously.

AT&T is also planning to offer its business and home customers high-speed Internet services over its recently acquired cable networks.

The large telecommunications companies' desire to reach major business markets with high-speed Net access has proved a boon to small data-focused companies like Covad and Northpoint. The major local companies hold considerable power inside their own service areas, but are looking to the smaller firms to expand outside of their own territories.

GTE will market its high-speed Net services initially to Internet service providers (ISPs) and companies with remote offices around the country.

The company recently cut its prices on basic DSL service to compete with cable broadband companies like Excite@Home and Road Runner.