CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Phones

Google's Project Fi automatically puts you on a VPN for every connection

That means extra privacy and security.

google-project-fi.png

Project Fi is Google's wireless service that uses other carriers' networks.

Claudia Cruz/CNET

On Tuesday, Google announced its new "enhanced network" for Project Fi.

For those who don't know, Project Fi is Google's very own wireless phone service. You pay $20 for unlimited calls and texts, and then $10 extra for every gigabyte of data you use (until you hit 6GB, then extra data is free). In the US it switches you between Sprint, T-Mobile and U.S. Cellular coverage depending on what's available, but it also works in 170+ countries -- making it a good option for people who travel a lot.

Now, with its new "enhanced network," Project Fi automatically puts you on a virtual private network (VPN) for every connection. That means you're using a VPN whenever you connect to Wi-Fi or mobile data. This gives you an extra layer of security when you're online and keeps your browsing information private. Google says VPN traffic isn't tied to your Google account.

Project Fi also announced a feature that automatically detects when your Wi-Fi connection is shoddy and switches you over to mobile data so you don't lose connection -- similar to Apple's Wi-Fi Assist. You can turn this feature on or off in your phone's settings, which is a good way to ensure you don't use too much data.

Google says it's rolling out these features over the next week to Project Fi-compatible phones running Android Pie.