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Shock! Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry uses Uber

Technically Incorrect: As the NBA finals begin tonight, the league MVP says he chats with his Uber drivers

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


A real Bay Area resident.

NBATV/Twitter screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

There's tension in the air.

On Thursday night, you see, my Golden State Warriors begin their attempt to repeat as NBA champions. Or, as Americans are wont to say, world champions.

(Full disclosure: I don't have an actual ownership stake in the franchise. But I'm sure you understand my emotional attachment.)

The Warriors face the Cleveland Cavaliers. And yesterday, the league MVP, Warriors point guard Stephen Curry, revealed there's more than vastly different playing styles between him and Cavaliers' forward LeBron James.

There's a huge transportational gulf.

James insist he drives to games in his Kia. He even publicly threatens to sue anyone who suggests he's faking it so that he can take money from the Korean carmaker.

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Curry, on the other hand, is a thoroughly modern Bay Area resident.

In a press conference tweeted by the NBA, the MVP revealed that he gets around in Uber cars.

He was chatting with his Uber driver only a day earlier, he told stunned reporters, who must have believed Curry rolls around in a Rolls-Royce or something.

Did Curry truly say he was in an Uber? What was the driver's reaction?

"I can't really re-enact it, but it was pretty funny," said Curry. "I just kind of laugh and chuckle, because they're surprised I'm getting in there, too."

Should you be a neutral observer, you now have a reason to root for the Warriors. Their star, in the words of his own coach Steve Kerr, looks like he's 12 years old. He takes an Uber to work. He's just like you.

The Curry endorsement should also serve as a welcome piece of publicity for Uber, given that on Wednesday it took $3.5 billion of investment money from Saudi Arabia, a country that doesn't allow women to drive.