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Fatberg livecam: Watch it grow 'visible yellow pustules'

The Museum of London's most disgusting exhibit goes moldy and gets its own live video feed, the FatCam.

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The fatberg piece as seen on the Museum of London's FatCam.

Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

Don't read this if you're eating lunch right now.

A fatberg is a nightmare clump of of things you're not supposed to flush down the toilet: oil, baby wipes, condoms, diapers and fat, all congealed together into a sewer system-clogging conglomeration of horror. 

The Museum of London put a chunk of a famous fatberg on display earlier this year. The piece came from what utility company Thames Water described in 2017 as the biggest ever fatberg found in London

Internet-dwelling fatberg fans can now monitor the monster through the museum's live FatCam.

The fatberg chunk resides in the museum's permanent collection after the exhibit it starred in closed in early July. The museum says the sewage pieces are highly toxic and will be stored in quarantine at the museum's store. 

The fatberg is constantly evolving. It hatched flies, sweated and changed colors while on display. "Since going off display, [the] fatberg has started to grow an unusual and toxic mold, in the form of visible yellow pustules," the museum reports.

The museum's experts identified the mold as aspergillus, a type of fungus that can cause chest infections in people with weakened immune systems. 

The museum classifies its FatCam stream under the YouTube category "Entertainment." If that's your idea of a good time, then more power to you.