Xbox at E3 Square Enix at E3 E3's PC Gaming Show Next iPhone and LTPO displays 2021 Doodle for Google winner Pre-Prime Day deals from Amazon

Europeans slow on broadband uptake

European households are about four times less likely than their North American counterparts to pay for high-speed Internet access this year, according to a new study conducted by Strategy Analytics, a market research firm. The survey shows that broadband Net subscriptions will rise to 3.3 percent of European homes, compared with 14.1 percent of households in North America. Strategy Analytics attributes higher PC ownership and usage, as well as a stronger cable industry, in North America to the findings. Sweden, with broadband in 9.4 percent of all homes, is Europe's high-speed hot spot, while the United Kingdom offers broadband Net access to less than 1 percent of households. By 2005, Strategy Analytics expects 53.1 percent of North American homes and 24.2 percent of European homes to subscribe to a broadband Internet service. Cable modems are expected to dominate in North America, while DSL (digital subscriber line) is likely to lead the way overseas.

European households are about four times less likely than their North American counterparts to pay for high-speed Internet access this year, according to a new study conducted by Strategy Analytics, a market research firm. The survey shows that broadband Net subscriptions will rise to 3.3 percent of European homes, compared with 14.1 percent of households in North America.

Strategy Analytics attributes higher PC ownership and usage, as well as a stronger cable industry, in North America to the findings. Sweden, with broadband in 9.4 percent of all homes, is Europe's high-speed hot spot, while the United Kingdom offers broadband Net access to less than 1 percent of households. By 2005, Strategy Analytics expects 53.1 percent of North American homes and 24.2 percent of European homes to subscribe to a broadband Internet service. Cable modems are expected to dominate in North America, while DSL (digital subscriber line) is likely to lead the way overseas.