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Vacuum Cleaners

Solve this puzzle and (maybe) win a job at Dyson

Dyson Smart Rooms is a "Crystal Maze"-style pop-up to find new software engineers.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

CNET's Vanessa Hand Orellana tests the Dyson Supersonic hairdryer.

Josh Miller/CNET

Are you smart enough to escape a locked room -- and walk into a job at Dyson?

The British company, famous for its vacuum cleaners and other slinkily designed home appliances, is recruiting 110 software engineers. And in a stunt to promote that hunt for new talent, Dyson is combining cryptic video brainteasers with one of those "escape the room"-type challenges.

On Saturday 4 February and Sunday 5 February, Dyson will open The Smart Rooms, a pop-up puzzle palace in London where contenders must complete software-engineering-based challenges. It's like "The Crystal Maze", only nerdier.

Working as part of a team on on your own, you'll quest to solve each puzzle and advance to the next room. Each challenge is projected onto the walls, so although you're not actually moving, you advance through different virtual environments.

The winners take home a 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner signed by James Dyson himself. And who knows, maybe Jim will spot your talent and take you on.

If you think you're smart enough to crack the Smart Rooms, all you have to do is find the entry code hidden in this video and send it to Dyson. Oh, and travel to London, but you're smart -- you can figure that out on your own.

As well as stylish vacuum cleaners, Dyson has various other contraptions that move air around. Take a look at the Supersonic hair dryer, Pure Cool Link air purifier or Dyson Humidifier.

Actual vacuum cleaners include the Small Ball or Cinetic Big Ball. To make your home more high-tech, explore our smart home section.

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