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Culture

Yes, you can cook Thanksgiving dinner with a drone

The self-promoting chefs at Autel Robotics set out to prove that drones aren't just for the birds -- they can help cook them, too.


With cars that drive themselves, flying Ubers on the horizon and so much technology surrounding us, it's fair to wonder why so little of it can help us with the hours-long tradition of preparing a Thanksgiving dinner.

The folks at Autel Robotics refused to accept that contemporary tech could be so impotent in the face of a mere 15-pound bird with all the fixins. So, they put one of their drones to work in the kitchen preparing the big meal.

You can check out the whole ingenious process in the video above. The company's X-Star Premium drone is used to peel potatoes and carrots with its propellers. This, of course, is not something that you should try at home, even if you use a "medieval armor-like glove" as in the demonstration.

While the veggies are boiling, the drone is then used to dip a turkey in the fryer for 25 minutes of flight time. This might not be such a bad idea given that Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, according to the US Fire Administration, thanks in no small part to fryer accidents. Having a skilled and patient enough drone pilot to keep that quadcopter hovering perfectly over the fryer is another matter.

Even more dangerous (and less effective) is the next step in meal prep, which is using the drone to chop the veggies and fresh herbs. However, switching out the propellers for four egg beaters that can then be used to whip potatoes, pie mix, topping and gravy simultaneously is brilliant, if a little messy.

In the end, the drone doesn't quite supplant the Turkey Day mastery of grandma or Uncle Dale, but it sure is fun. I know I'm thankful to have the option.