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Sci-Tech

Crazy-bright 90,000-lumen LED flashlight turns night into day

Light up your life with a handheld flashlight that makes you think the sun magically came out early.

This homemade flashlight can banish the dark.

Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

When people pick the superpowers they'd most like to have, they usually go for things like flying, invisibility or super-strength. How about the power to turn night into day? That would be pretty cool. YouTube user rctestflight didn't need to be bit by a radioactive spider or come from another planet to gain control over the power of the sun. He just built what he calls "the world's brightest flashlight," though that's a hard claim to verify.

The blindingly bright homemade creation doesn't look much like a normal tubular flashlight. Rctestflight connected 10 100-watt LED chips. Each one gets its own large heat sink. Aluminum bars hold the crazy mess together. It's battery-powered, and the bars act as handles to make the flashlight portable.

The light sucks battery and gets about 10 minutes of glow-time. "It gets pretty hot, but it's manageable," rctestflight reports. The whole kit weighs 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) so it's not the sort of thing you'd take backpacking, but it will light up the landscape like a sunny day if you need it to.

A video released Saturday detailing the build includes several impressive demonstrations of the flashlight at work. A dark nighttime street scene turns into a oasis of light when seen from the vantage point of a quadcopter hovering above.

The monster flashlight may well be the world's most intimidating spotlight. It can light up clouds and illuminate a distant mountain.

So what do you do with a scorching 1,000-watt, 90,000-lumen flashlight? According to rctestflight, you take dramatic night landscape photos and then go hunt for Bigfoot. Just keep this catch in mind: "This device isn't very practical for most uses because it just blinds you if you're shining it at anything closer than about 100 feet."

(Via The Awesomer)