HolidayBuyer's Guide

Nicki Minaj, Pharrell -- Beats stuffs new ad full of stars

Technically Incorrect: To advertise the new wireless world of parent company Apple, the headphone maker has a multitude of famous people channeling Disney.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


Pharrell Williams, just one of the stars celebrating newfound wireless freedom.

Pharrell Williams, just one of the stars celebrating newfound wireless freedom.

Photo by Beats; YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Beats By Dre headphones are a resounding victory of branding over ears.

At least that's what some audio aficionados believe.

Much of the success has revolved around cool styling and having the headphones hang around the necks of famous people.

From NBA superstar LeBron James to slightly overrated soccer player Neymar, Beats has featured aspirational figures in its ads.

If your heroes love Beats, you should too.

The brand's latest ad positively gorges itself on the gorgeous and famous.

To the tune of "I've Got No Strings" from Disney's "Pinocchio," we see a veritable catwalk of Category A personalities loving their wireless freedom -- from Nicki Minaj, Rebel Wilson, Pharrell and Michael Phelps to, um, Steve Buscemi and DJ Khaled.

They're all so happy because now they're free to wave their arms around, twirl, slap men's bottoms and generally flaunt their star power.

It's all charming and winning, even if the only product featured here that's currently available is the Solo3 Wireless. (The Powerbeats3 Wireless and Beats X are due to arrive soon.)

The deeply dry, though, might be wondering why this star formula works so well for Beats but hasn't enjoyed quite the same success with its sister brand Apple Music.

Both brands have the brilliant Jimmy Iovine in charge. Apple Music has featured Taylor Swift, John Travolta and James Corden among many others. Yet the service hasn't overwhelmed Spotify at all.

Beats always had a style and a unique design sense that created a point of difference well before the stars came along. Apple Music is still struggling to achieve that.

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