Airbnb gets political in Super Bowl ad about acceptance

Commentary: Airbnb declares it's without prejudice and launches "We accept" campaign. The implication is clear.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


All inclusive?

Airbnb/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Many wondered how political Super Bowl 2017 ads would be.

One or two of those already revealed had tinges. Budweiser, for instance, addressed immigration, while claiming this was just a coincidence.

Airbnb decided to face up to the new Trumpist atmosphere. It ran a simple ad that trumpeted acceptance and launched the company's #weaccept campaign, pledging to provide short-term housing to 100,000 people in need over the next five years. The company says it will also contribute $4 million to the International Rescue Committee over four years.

Whoever you are, wherever you're from, whomever you love and whatever you believe, Airbnb insists that you will be accepted by everyone else in its community.

Apparently, the world becomes more beautiful the more you accept.

I fear one or two people might not entirely agree.

No, I don't just mean certain government officials who seem keen on a little division, especially after the controversial immigration order that's been opposed by many tech companies.

I'm referring to those Airbnb hosts who, according to some guests, have expressed racist tendencies. It's something the company is reportedly addressing.

CEO Brian Chesky tweeted about the #weaccept campaign during the game. Chesky was one of the more vocal CEOs opposing the immigration ban. And the company followed up by creating a webpage where people can volunteer their homes to stranded refugees.

On Airbnb's Twitter account Sunday, there wasn't universal acceptance of the acceptance sentiment. Yes, nirvana is a long way off.

First published Feb. 5, 5:27 p.m. PT.
Update, Feb. 6 at 3:13 p.m.: Adds details on #weaccept campaign.

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