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9 great reads from CNET this week

Why Microsoft's Surface Duo isn't an iPhone or Galaxy Fold, how Epic is painting Apple and Google as comic book villains, and what a Vice President Kamala Harris would mean for tech.

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The tech industry kept courthouses busy this week, figuratively speaking anyway. First, a California judge put the breaks on Uber and Lyft, issuing an injunction on the ride-hailing companies that would require them to follow state law and reclassify their drivers as employees. Both said they'll have to suspend operations in the state if the court doesn't reconsider. Then Fortnite maker Epic Games filed suit against Apple and Google after the tech giants removed the popular game from their digital marketplaces.

And TikTok's US employees are planning a suit against the Trump administration over an executive order they say would make it illegal for their employer to pay them.

Meanwhile, we got a behind-the-scenes first look at Microsoft's two-screen superthin Surface Duo and learned the company will be launching its next Xbox in November. Also, we got a peek at Intel's Tiger Lake chips, which promise faster speeds, better graphics and longer battery life. 

Here are the week's stories you don't want to miss.

Fortnite maker Epic's battle with Apple and Google is about making them into villains

The game maker is painting Apple and Google as comic book villain monopolists.

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CNET

Building a better tornado warning system when minutes count

A technology used to listen for nuclear bomb tests could be the key to more-effective warnings for those in the path of a tornado.

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Getty Images

Democratic, Republican conventions will be like none we've seen before

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced the parties to take the events online.

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Bastiaan Slabbers/Getty Images

How China uses facial recognition to control human behavior

When facial recognition is everywhere, anything you do is fair game for public shaming and punishment.

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Gilles Sabrie/Getty Images

TikTok is either Microsoft's 'poisoned chalice,' next big thing or easy-money scheme

Microsoft, known for enterprise software, may soon gobble up TikTok from its Chinese owner. We try to figure out what happens next.

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Angela Lang/CNET

Microsoft's two-screen Surface Duo isn't an iPhone or Galaxy Fold. That's the point

Exclusive: Microsoft spent five years working on a super-thin, dual-screen, hinged $1,399 phone to compete with Apple and Samsung. We got the behind-the-screen first look.

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Richard Peterson/CNET

Next-gen rescue vehicles leave ambulances in their dust

From drones to flying go-carts to million-dollar command centers, natural disaster response vehicles keep things running so first responders can save lives.

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SkyRunner

Turkish Star Wars and the bizarre world of foreign remakes

The Turkish Exorcist, the Pakistani Dracula and how film industries around the world remixed and ripped off Hollywood.

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3 Dev Adam

Kamala Harris is Joe Biden's VP pick. Here's what she means for tech

The Democratic challenger makes good on his promise to choose a woman as his VP running mate. Here's how that could affect the technology industry.

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Getty Images