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How to organize your channels in the new Roku app

Roku's updated app makes some much-needed improvements, but how the heck do you organize channels?

Yesterday Roku rolled out version 4.0 of its Android and iOS apps. Among the new features: an onscreen remote that more closely resembles the real thing, a "What's On" tab for finding stuff to watch and, arguably best of all, a Channels screen for quick, one-tap access to your favorites.

As you may notice, that screen more or less duplicates your Roku's home screen, with all your favorite channels arranged in a grid:

Rick Broida/CNET

You may also notice there's no apparent way to reorganize those icons. You can tap and hold one to access options for that channel (remove, rate, etc.), but if you want to move one, you're out of luck.

Actually, there's a workaround: You have to move channels on your Roku proper. (In other words, not in the app.) Not familiar with that process? Here's how it works:

Step 1: Find a channel you want to relocate -- let's say HBO Now -- and highlight it with your remote. (Don't actually select it, just move the cursor over it so it's highlighted.)

Step 2: Press the Option button on your remote (it looks like an asterisk), then choose Move Channel.

Step 3: Now use the direction pad to move the icon where you want it, noting how others move out of the way as you go.

Step 4: Once you've found the perfect spot, press OK to complete the process. Repeat as necessary.

The changes should be reflected within the app almost immediately. (If not, you may have to close it and launch it again.) By the way, this works for deleting channels as well, though as noted above, you can do that within the app following a long press of any channel icon.

Actually, there's an exception to that: You can't seem to move or delete the two "sponsored" channels at the very top, which in my app are Fandango Now and AOL News. Grumble, grumble.

But at least now you know how to rearrange the channels below those.

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