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Best Smart Locks of 2024

A smart lock lets you unlock your front door with a fingerprint, monitor access, and give friends short-term passes. These are the best smart locks for your home, including retrofits, new deadbolts, and handle replacements.

Updated Feb. 9, 2024 9:00 a.m. PT

Written by  Tyler Lacoma David Priest Molly Price
Our expert, award-winning staff selects the products we cover and rigorously researches and tests our top picks. If you buy through our links, we may get a commission. Reviews ethics statement
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Tyler Lacoma Editor / Home Security
For more than 10 years Tyler has used his experience in smart home tech to craft how-to guides, explainers, and recommendations for technology of all kinds. From using his home in beautiful Bend, OR as a testing zone for the latest security products to digging into the nuts and bolts of the best data privacy guidelines, Tyler has experience in all aspects of protecting your home and belongings. With a BA in Writing from George Fox and certification in Technical Writing from Oregon State University, he's ready to get you the details you need to make the best decisions for your home. On off hours, you can find Tyler exploring the Cascade trails, finding the latest brew in town with some friends, or trying a new recipe in the kitchen!
Expertise Smart home, smart security, home tech, energy savings, A/V
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David Priest Former editor
David Priest is an award-winning writer and editor who formerly covered home security for CNET.
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Molly Price Former Editor
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$190 at Amazon
A hand touches the Aqara keypad on a gray door.
Best overall home smart lock
Aqara Smart Lock U100
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$149 at Amazon
The August Wi-Fi Smart Lock installed in a white door.
Best retrofit smart lock
August Wi-Fi Smart Lock
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$128 at Amazon
A person holding a bag of groceries stands in front of an open white door with an Ultraloq keypad deadbolt installed on it.
Best budget smart lock
Ultraloq U-Bolt Pro with Wi-Fi
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$120 at Amazon
The August Smart Lock sitting upright on a table.
Best smart lock for apartments
August Smart Lock and Connect
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$189 at Amazon
The Yale Assure Lock 2 shown on a blue door that's open to show both inside and outside components.
Best keyless smart lock
Yale Assure Lock 2
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$230 at Lockly
A finger touches the Lockly fingerprint reader installed on a metal deadbolt on a white door.
Best smart lock for a tight fit
Lockly Flex Touch Pro
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$280 at Amazon
A Schlage smart lever shown on an open taupe door showing the inside of a home.
Best smart lock handle replacement
Schlage Encode Smart Wi-Fi Lever
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What's the best overall smart lock?

Smart locks bring security and lots of connected convenience to your front door, and we've spent years testing devices to find the best of the bunch. The smart lock we recommend to most folks is the Aqara Smart Lock U100, one of the most advanced locks we've seen, with Matter support, an excellent array of entry management options and a sleek design. It's currently at the top of the smart lock game, but trusted brands like August, Lockly and Schlage also have excellent models to secure your front door.

Curious about smart locks? These connected devices, powered by batteries that need replacing every few months, will help you manage access to your home. They're great for letting workers, houseguests and pet sitters in without the need for a key, and they're a godsend when you get into bed only to realize you forgot to lock up. Beyond that, you'll find a growing number of models with advanced features, including touchpad controls, fingerprint readers and built-in sensors that can tell you if the door is ever left ajar. They even have options for retrofit (you get to keep your current lock and put smart lock tech over it) or replacement (you choose a shiny new deadbolt to complement your door).

Scroll on to check out our favorites, listed below. We'll update this page regularly as our testing continues.

Best smart locks of 2024

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$190 at Amazon

Best overall home smart lock

Aqara Smart Lock U100

Aqara brings the latest smart lock technology together in excellent form with its combination deadbolt and sleek entry pad. For people focused on software and security, it’s one of the new wave of smart locks with Matter compatibility, which means it plays nice with multiple home platforms from Google, Amazon and Apple, plus there's added security when encrypting and sending smart home data. For Apple fans, it’s one of the best Siri-friendly locks and is compatible with Apple’s latest Home Key passes. Or if you’re interested primarily in hardware, we found the IP65-rated lock to be durable, efficient and relatively easy to install.

The list of features behind Aqara’s smart lock is lengthy, but we noted important standouts. In addition to the keypad for entry, the lock includes a fingerprint reader: If you add the Aquara ZigBee hub, it can manage up to 50 fingerprints. Apps allow you to create one-time passes (a vital part of any modern smart lock), while a built-in gyroscope ensures the door automatically locks if it’s left unlocked for too long.

With any smart lock comes the need to manage battery life, which is why we were also impressed with how the basic AA battery panel has a backup USB-C port to charge directly in case your drawers are suddenly out of batteries (and you have a portable charger handy). If you’re looking for a sturdy lock that does a bit of everything in any climate, the Aqara Smart Lock U100 is an easy recommendation.

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Editors' choice
$149 at Amazon

Best retrofit smart lock

August Wi-Fi Smart Lock

This August lock has been on our list for some time now, has frequently starred as an Editor’s Choice selection, and continues to impress, especially as a retrofit model. That means you don’t have to replace your existing deadbolt to use it: The August lock fits over the bolt to control via app or voice assistant, a somewhat bulky (August continues to slim down its hardware) but extremely convenient option.

August’s locking features cover all the bases, including auto-locking, the “DoorSense” open/close notifications, and a log of all activity. As with many locks on our list, you also have the handy ability to send guest access passes with customized deadlines (very convenient for managing anyone from a house cleaner to vacationing friends).

Though August’s latest lock doesn’t have Matter quite yet, it’s still fully compatible with Alexa, Google Home and Apple Home, so you aren’t missing much. Plus, we’re currently finding the fourth-gen August lock for under $150, an excellent deal compared to its original price and another way to save with this retrofitting option. Keep in mind, you will have to manage the rechargeable lithium battery when using this lock.

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$128 at Amazon

Best budget smart lock

Ultraloq U-Bolt Pro with Wi-Fi

Smart locks aren’t famous for their budget options, which still tend to go well above $100 if you want the best features. This Ultraloq model is one of the best matches we’ve found between affordability and features, including a durable keypad and built-in fingerprint sensor. Our tests also found that the Ultraloq's Wi-fi range was particularly excellent for a smart lock, making this a good choice for a sublease, granny pod, Airbnb apartment and many similar situations.

Options like eKey sharing and management make it easy to offer digital passes to friends and family and control how they’re used, while the IP65 rating ensures that weather is no problem no matter how harsh your seasons get. Alexa and Google Assistant compatibility round off this lock nicely, but we do miss Apple support.

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$120 at Amazon

Best smart lock for apartments

August Smart Lock and Connect

August's third-gen Smart Lock and Connect bundle comes with a DoorSense open-close sensor and the August Connect plug-in Wi-Fi bridge. The low-profile, retrofit design means you won't need to replace your existing deadbolt lock and installation is easy, although, as with similar August models, users will need to replace the "thumbturn" on the inside of their door to use it. If you’re renting, absolutely check with your landlord and lease before installing one of these, even as a retrofit: Landlords often like to handle home security tech themselves and will need to sign off.

Once the lock is installed, you’ll get those great August features, including virtual key passes, an activity feed, auto-unlock and auto-lock and even the ability to access the lock with your Apple Watch.

With that August Connect Wi-Fi bridge pairing the lock with your home network, this version of the August lock is compatible with Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa for voice control. And you'll find the same great remote access features in the August mobile app. About the only August feature you don't get here is compatibility with Apple HomeKit (sorry, Siri). Available in silver or dark gray for around $215, it's the first smart lock I'd recommend if you live in an apartment and don't want to remove your existing lock.

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$189 at Amazon

Best keyless smart lock

Yale Assure Lock 2

Many of our picks are mostly keyless, but Yale takes the concept to the next level with a smart lock as smooth-looking as it is smooth to use. Once installed, the deadbolt offers a keypad, fingerprint scanner and app control options for locking or unlocking. Autounlock features are also available if you prefer to enable them. You also get unlimited passes to share (and track) with family and friends.

Yale is another brand doing very well with smart home compatibility, offering support for the three big voice assistants. We also like that it’s available in a few different finishes to better match your existing fixtures. Oh, and if you’re still looking for a good Airbnb smart lock, this Yale model costs more than our Ultraloq pick but it works directly with the Airbnb app for easier scheduling, sending passes directly to guests, and so on.

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$230 at Lockly

Best smart lock for a tight fit

Lockly Flex Touch Pro

If biometrics have caught your eye, and you’d like to upgrade your current door with a fingerprint sensor, Lockly’s retrofit adds a minimal scanner that’s bound to fit your current door. With a compact form both inside and out, this Lockly offering includes a separate Wi-Fi hub to manage the internet connection from a nearby nook or entryway table. In addition to fingerprint scanning, users can sign in with the app or a scannable QR code. Digital keys and badges provide a variety of options for short-term access without collecting everyone’s fingerprints.

We also like the battery life, rated for nine months (on the higher end of our research), plus there's a backup battery in case things go wrong. Overall, if you’re worried that your current single cylinder deadbolt just doesn’t have enough room for smart features, Lockly is ready to change your mind.

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$280 at Amazon

Best smart lock handle replacement

Schlage Encode Smart Wi-Fi Lever

Not everyone has a deadbolt or wants a deadbolt replacement to get smart lock features. We’re impressed with Schlage’s alternative, a smart Wi-Fi lever to replace your current door handle instead but still provide many of the same amenities. The built-in Wi-Fi lets you set up to 100 entry codes, customize notifications, review activity logs and set schedules for autolocking. While the lock is primarily focused on code entry with app management, it does work with Alexa and Google Assistant for additional voice control options

One downside: The smart handle is one of our priciest picks, so it may not be in everyone’s budget range. However, this Schlage lock is available in a variety of colors and styles, and some do cost less than others depending on supply, so it’s worth taking a look at different designs and finding what matches your home while saving some money.

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Other smart locks we've tested

In our search for the best smart lock, these are some of the other products we've tried out:

The Kwikset Halo Touch fingerprint-scanning smart lock against a purple backdrop.

The Kwikset Halo Touch is a no-frills fingerprint lock with built-in Wi-Fi and support for Alexa or Google Assistant.

Ry Crist/CNET

Nest Yale Lock: Nest and Yale partnered up for a Google-centric smart lock with a touch keypad. This Nest app smart door lock has the good looks of Yale's earlier models, but it isn't quite as capable as other keyless locks when it comes to smart home integration. 

Array by Hampton Connected Door Lock: This lock has solar-powered battery backup and built-in Wi-Fi, but it's expensive and doesn't have the option to work with HomeKit or Google Assistant yet.

Kwikset Halo Touch: The Halo Touch is a simple, straightforward fingerprint lock that costs $234. With built-in Wi-Fi, there's no need for any additional hub hardware -- just install it, pair it with your home network, and you'll be all set. It was a strong performer in our tests, with a snappy, responsive fingerprint scanner and a relatively quiet design, and it supports voice controls via Alexa or Google Assistant (no HomeKit support, though). If it were me buying, I'd try to catch it on sale for less than $200, but this is definitely a smart lock worth considering if you want fingerprint access at your front door.

Kwikset Kevo Bluetooth Deadbolt: Kwikset's second-gen Kevo is a good Bluetooth smart lock and a simple answer to smartening your door if you don't need remote control access. If you do, you'll need to buy the Kevo Plus connect module. You can use the mobile app or the key fob for keyless door entry.

Wyze Smart Lock: We like how affordable the Wyze lock is. However, for around $30 more, the Ultraloq model offers a lot more, so it's currently our top budget pick. Also, Wyze has had a string of security issues that it hasn't been able resolve at the level of other brands, like August, so we'd like to keep an eye on Wyze for a while.

The Lockly Flex Touch Smart Lock against a blue backdrop.

The Lockly Flex Touch is a Bluetooth smart lock with a built-in fingerprint scanner, but you'll need to pay an extra $80 for the plug-in Wi-Fi hub that lets you control it from anywhere or pair it with a voice assistant.

Ry Crist/CNET

Lockly Flex Touch: An understated fingerprint lock, the Flex Touch looks like a standard deadbolt on the outside, apart from the small fingerprint sensor that dangles underneath. That fingerprint sensor worked great when we tested it out, but the interior part of the lock is made of faux-stainless-steel plastic that feels a bit cheap to the touch. In addition to that, you'll need to buy an overpriced $80 plug-in Wi-Fi hub if you want to control the lock via your phone from beyond Bluetooth range.

Schlage Sense Bluetooth Deadbolt: Schlage's Sense smart lock is affordable, but clunky and not as simple to set up as its Encode sibling. You'll also need a Schlage lock Wi-Fi adapter to connect with Google Assistant or Alexa.

Eufy Smart Lock Touch with Wi-Fi: At a retail price of $260, Eufy's sleek-looking, finger-scanning smart lock is too expensive for us to recommend outright, but it performed well when we tested it out, apart from a few minor hiccups during setup. With both a fingerprint scanner and a touchpad for coded entry, it's about as versatile as smart locks get, but it's probably more than most people need.

Product comparison for smart locks

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Smart locks:Aqara Smart Lock U100August Smart Lock 4th-GenUltraloq U-Bolt ProAugust Smart Lock and ConnectYale Assure Lock 2Lockly Flex Touch ProSchlage Encode Smart Wi-Fi Lever
Price $190$150$137$200$350$230$295
Lock design Deadbolt, keylessDeadboltDeadbolt, keylessDeadboltDeadbolt, keylessDeadbolt, keylessLever/handle, keyless
Unlocking options App, HomeKey, Entrypad, biometric, failsafe keyApp, keyApp, entrypad, biometric, App, Apple WatchApp, entrypad, Apple WatchApp, biometricApp, entrypad, backup key
Installation type ReplacementRetrofitReplacementRetrofitReplacementRetrofitReplacemet
Power options 4 AA batteries2 rechageable batteriesAA batteries2 rechargeable batteries4 AA batteries8 AA batteries9V battery
Voice assistant Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple SiriAmazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple Siri, Samsung BixbyAmazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Samsung Bixby, IFTTTAmazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple Siri, Samsung BixbyAmazon Alexa, Google Assistant, Apple SiriAmazon Alexa, Google AssistantAmazon Alexa, Google Assistant

How we test smart locks

The CNET team has spent years testing and reviewing smart locks. For our most recent batch of tests, we tried out several new models at our own homes.

Installation process

For starters, we took a critical eye to each lock's design, as well as the simplicity of the installation process. It's usually not a complicated process, and in most cases you'll only need a Phillips head screwdriver, but it still might feel intimidating for some. 

Most smart locks do a good job of including detailed instructions in the box and in the app, but others, like the Kwikset Halo Touch, go a step further by clearly labeling and separating the different parts and screws you'll need to use. That can be a big help if you've never swapped out a door lock before.

Kwikset Halo Touch smart lock

Some smart locks, like the Kwikset Halo Touch, make installation a breeze. 

Ry Crist/CNET

Rather than installing the locks in our front doors, we installed them in a mock door display cut to standard specifications. That allowed us to move each lock after installing it, which helped to test their wireless range when controlling them over Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. 

Some locks did great -- most notably the U-Bolt Pro with Wi-Fi, which worked flawlessly even in a backyard, on the fringes of a home Wi-Fi network. The Level Lock was another standout thanks to a neat range-boosting feature that allowed us to control the lock over Bluetooth from nearly twice the distance as other Bluetooth smart locks (albeit at an expense of battery life).

img-2507

The U-Bolt Pro with built-in Wi-Fi was the top finisher in our range tests, as we were able to reliably control it from a phone even with the lock in a backyard, on the fringes of the home Wi-Fi network. No other Wi-Fi lock we tested worked as flawlessly this far from the router.

Ry Crist/CNET

Additional features and app integration

From there, the testing is largely experiential. We pay attention to important physical considerations like the size of the lock and how loud the motor gets when the deadbolt turns, as well as practical considerations like app features, ease of use and the range of compatibility with different smart home platforms and peripheral devices. 

Some smart locks, particularly coded smart locks, are better for sharing access with guests. Others, including Bluetooth locks with auto-unlocking smarts whenever you draw near, are better for users who are more convenience-minded. Whatever the lock's approach, the features need to work well if it wants to earn our recommendation.

Design

Smart design matters, too. Apart from the fact that these locks are likely going to be sitting on the front face of your home's exterior and making a first impression on visitors, good design can make for better implementation of core features. 

For instance, the U-Bolt Pro stood out for its clever build, with the fingerprint-scanning front face of the lock folding down entirely to reveal a standard keyhole backup. Hiding the keyhole makes a lot of sense -- most of the time, you aren't going to use it to get in, and putting it out of sight gives the lock a smaller footprint on your front door than other fingerprint-scanning locks. We also liked the physical buttons on that lock for coded entry, as buttons like those are easier to use in inclement weather than touchscreen controls. Another nice design touch: You can punch in dummy digits before or after your code, and the lock will still let you in. That's a good feature if you're worried about people snooping over your shoulder as you unlock the door.

Factors to consider when choosing a smart lock

Smart locks are a highly visible part of your home that you'll use just about every day, so it's important to find a reliable pick that meshes well with your smart home. Here are the factors you should be thinking about as you shop:

august-smart-lock-product-photos-26.jpg

A retrofit smart lock like the August lock will replace the interior of your existing lock, but not the exterior keyhole or the deadbolt.

CNET

Full deadbolt or retrofit

Most smart locks will replace the entirety of your existing lock, including the interior thumbturn, the exterior keyhole, and the deadbolt in the middle. Locks like those will also come with their own keys, which will replace the ones you're using now.

Others, like the August Smart Lock, and the Lockly fingerprint model, are designed instead to work with at least some of your existing lock hardware. With a retrofit lock like that, you probably won't need new keys at all, and you might not even need to swap out the deadbolt. Locks like those can sometimes be a better fit for apartments, where the building owners might not allow you to replace the entire lock.

Modes of access

Different smart locks will take different approaches to letting you in. On a basic level, most smart locks will let you lock and unlock the door wirelessly from your phone, using an app. Others add in keypads for coded entry, which can help you rely on your keys a little less while also making it easier to share access with others. Some of the newest smart locks add in touch sensitivity or fingerprint scanning to let you inside with just a tap. Apple has also added a Home Key" target="_blank feature in iOS15 that lets you store a digital house key in your Apple Wallet, which lets you open compatible smart locks using the NFC radio in your iPhone or Apple Watch.

It may be overkill to pay up for a smart lock that offers all of that, so it's fine to dial in on the mode of access that interests you most. You've got a diverse mix of options these days.

Platform compatibility and Matter

schlage-encode-plus-with-home-keys-phone-taptounlock

The Schlage Encode Plus is the first smart lock to support Apple Home Key. Similar to Apple Pay, Home Key lets you unlock your door using the NFC radio in your iPhone or Apple Watch.

Schlage

If your household includes multiple types of smart home devices, then your best bet is to control them all from a single smart home platform -- that way, you won't need to juggle multiple apps to keep everything automated. The most popular picks are Amazon Alexa; the Google Home app and the Google Assistant voice controls that come with it; and Apple HomeKit, which brings Siri into play. Samsung SmartThings is another option for a hub-centric smart home.

That brings us to Matter: Matter (and its tagalong protocol Thread) is an important smart home protocol designed in coordination with major brands including Google, Amazon, Apple, and many others. It helps guarantee compatibility across different platforms and adds in extra security and data transfer benefits — definitely something buyers should be watching for.

Currently, smart lock companies are still adopting the Matter standard. Our top pick uses it and is one of the best options we’ve found. Some Schlage Encode locks use it, but it hasn’t made its way to our Schlage Smart Level pick quite yet, and the same goes for Yale Assure. August has also announced it's working to bring Matter to its smart locks, so in some cases it just be a “matter” of waiting for the right firmware update.

Security and privacy

Smart locks aren't quite as data sensitive as devices with built-in cameras and microphones, but you'll still want to make sure that you're keeping things secure. Most, if not all of your options will use some form of encryption to keep the wireless transmissions between your lock and your phone or home network secure -- you should also look for locks that use two-factor authentication to keep your account safe from malicious logins. And, as with any connected device in your home, you'll want to be sure to keep your lock updated to the latest firmware, and to set a strong password in the app.

As for lockpicking and other physical concerns, you can look for the lock's ANSI grade to get a sense of its durability, and how well it might stand up against a brute force entry attack. ANSI grade 3 is the most basic rating, but a growing number of smart locks offer ANSI grade 2 or grade 1 ratings, which tell you that they're built with commercial-grade durability. If you're concerned about forced entries, a lock like that might be a good investment.

Design considerations

Your smart lock is going to sit right on the front of your home's exterior, so it's worth aiming for something you won't hate looking at. Some smart locks go out of their way to show off their gadgety features with light-up touchscreens, color-coded LED indicator lights and tech-minded designs. Others take the opposite approach, doing their best to blend in and look just like a standard lock, from the outside at least. Picking a preference between the two approaches will help you narrow your options.

You'll also want to consider how the lock stays powered. Most smart locks will run off four AA batteries, but some take a different approach. The Level Lock, for instance, runs off of a single CR2 battery that sits inside of the deadbolt itself. Meanwhile, Eufy's touchscreen smart lock runs off of a rechargeable battery pack.

Smart lock FAQ

Here are the answers to some of the most common questions about smart locks.

How secure are smart locks?

Smart locks from major developers, like Yale and Schlage, are reliable security devices -- but only if you use them correctly. In the same way a lock three feet from a key hidden under a doormat isn't very secure, a smart lock with the PIN 1-2-3-4 won't be very secure. Smart locks can even be more secure than conventional locks, since keys are easier to lose than, say, your fingers, if you're using a fingerprint lock.

Why are smart locks so expensive?

Like most smart home tech, smart locks are getting more affordable all the time -- but that doesn't mean they're cheap. Between the conventional hardware (which often includes a deadbolt and other parts of the lock mechanism), the "smart" hardware (which includes computer chips and various kinds of radios) and the software (which includes digital security measures like encryption), a lot goes into a smart lock. So finding one for under a hundred bucks, which isn't unusual these days, is actually a solid deal.

Can smart locks be hacked?

Smart locks, like any Wi-Fi-connected device, can be hacked. But as long as you're finding smart locks from reliable developers, the communications that would allow a hacker to trigger the lock should be thoroughly encrypted -- making hacking pretty difficult. It's important to keep in mind, too, that robberies are often crimes of convenience. So unless you live in a totally secure compound, protecting one-of-a-kind jewels, an unlocked window or an open garage door is a more likely point of entry than your theoretically hackable smart lock.

Are smart locks risky?

While smart lock hacking isn't much of a risk to your individual home's security thanks to encryption, that doesn't mean smart locks pose no risks. Battery-powered smart locks can lead to problems in the long run if you're not diligent about keeping them powered. Smart lock hacking can also pose a larger societal problem when unsecured smart home gadgets are hacked en masse to carry out distributed denial-of-service attacks against internet-dependent institutions, such as banks. You can mitigate that sort of risk by setting strong passwords for the apps that control your smart home, and by using security-minded features like two-factor authentication.

Is it hard to install smart locks?

With basic DIY skills, you won’t have to worry about calling a locksmith, unless things go badly wrong. Even deadbolt replacements are doable if you can find out how to disassemble your current deadbolt. Top brands are good at providing installation videos and other in-depth instructions to show you how to wield that screwdriver and get the job done. Expect the project to take around an hour if it’s your first time setting up a smart lock.

How can I manage smart lock battery life?

Smart locks use battery power when they're activated, so battery life greatly depends on how many people are opening and closing or locking and unlocking your door throughout the day. You can expect the average smart lock to last at least several months before it needs new batteries. If batteries are running out in only a couple of weeks or less, there’s probably something wrong, like an update the doorbell is trying to install or a Wi-Fi connection that keeps reconnecting.