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Ikea is saying goodbye to non-rechargeable batteries

The company will remove all non-rechargeable alkaline batteries from its global home furnishings by October 2021.

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Ikea will no longer use non-rechargeable alkaline batteries in its home furnishings.
Dave Rushen/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Ikea will remove all non-rechargeable alkaline batteries from its global home furnishings by October 2021, the company said Wednesday. Aiming to reduce energy consumption and environmental waste with the move, the home furnishing giant cited the results of recent life-cycle assessment studies showing the environmental impact of alkaline batteries is higher compared with rechargeable nickel metal hydride batteries, when used in common household devices.

"We are on a journey to inspire and enable people to live healthier and more sustainable lives within the boundaries of the planet," said Ikea Sustainability Development Manager Caroline Reid in a release. "By phasing out alkaline batteries and focusing on our range of rechargeable batteries, we are taking one step on that journey, offering customers an affordable and convenient solution to prolong the life of products and materials and reduce waste." 

The Swedish company, based in the Netherlands, said between September 2018 and August 2019 it sold about 300 million alkaline batteries globally. Ikea calculates that if all of its customers switched from alkaline to rechargeable batteries and recharged them just 50 times, global waste could be reduced by as much as 5,000 tons on an annual basis.

Ikea sells it's own line of rechargeable batteries, known as Ladda. A four pack costs $7, while chargers needed to refill them start at $9. 

Ikea added, however, that where required for an individual product to function, some lithium ion button cell batteries will be kept in the product range. 

Read more: Hunter Douglas smart shades ditch the AAs for rechargeable battery wands