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Best Wi-Fi routers for 2022

Your Wi-Fi router is the unsung hero holding your smart home together. From mesh to gaming to Wi-Fi 6, these are the best we've tested.

We're all depending on our home networks to keep us connected during the ongoing pandemic, and it's more important than ever to have a decent Wi-Fi router managing your web traffic. If you're in need of a new one, then you'll be happy to hear that routers have come a long way in the past few years or so, with a number of noteworthy advancements worth considering as you hunt for an upgrade.

For starters, there's a new-and-improved version of the Wi-Fi standard called 802.11ax -- or Wi-Fi 6 -- and it boasts faster, more efficient home network performance. On top of that, there's a growing number of mesh router options that are well worth considering, too, particularly since many of them are far less expensive than previous router combo systems.

Shop around, and you'll also find new Wi-Fi 6E routers capable of sending signals using newly opened bandwidth in the 6GHz band. Just don't expect routers like those to come cheap.

Watch this: Which router upgrade is right for you?

All of that means that you've got a lot to think about if you're currently in the market for an upgrade. That's where we come in. Whether you're interested in gaming routersmesh systemsWi-Fi 6 routers or if you just want something decent that won't break the bank, we're here to simplify things and point you in the right direction.

Expect regular updates to this post as we continue testing networking devices throughout 2022. When we find a new router that merits strong consideration, we'll add it to this list with links to our most recent test data.

Read more: Best internet providers for 2022

Ry Crist/CNET

Available for $100 (or less if you catch a sale), the TP-Link Archer AX21 is an entry-level, dual-band Wi-Fi 6 router that supports top speeds of up to 1,201Mbps (1.2Gbps) on its 5GHz band. It's nothing fancy, but it offered near flawless performance for small- to medium-size homes in our tests, and it's a cinch to setup and use thanks to TP-Link's Tether app.

Best of all, when tested against other, similar routers from names like Asus and Netgear, the AX21 held its own with faster download speeds, better range, and low latency, too. Add in a functional bandsteering mode that automatically steers you between the 2.4 and 5GHz bands within a single network, plus guest network controls and even a quality of service engine for prioritizing traffic to the most important devices on your network, and you're looking at a decent home networking upgrade that's as simple and affordable as it gets.

Now's a decent time to grab it, too. As of mid-January, most retailers have it listed for $90 -- not the best price we've seen it sell for, but still a discount.

Read our TP-Link Archer AX21 review.

 

Chris Monroe/CNET

For the best performance from your mesh router, you'll want to prioritize getting one with support for Wi-Fi 6, plus a tri-band design that includes three separate bands of traffic: the usual 2.4 and 5GHz bands, plus an additional 5GHz band that the system can use as a dedicated wireless backhaul for transmissions between the router and its satellites. Most mesh routers like that cost at least $300 or even $400, but the TP-Link Deco W7200 gets you there for just $229.

That's the best deal I've seen for a tri-band mesh router with support for Wi-Fi 6 -- and sure enough, it's an excellent performer, as well. In fact, the only system that managed to outperform it outright in my at-home speed tests is the AX6000 version of Netgear Orbi, which costs more than three times as much (keep reading for more on that one). On top of that, TP-Link's setup process is about as easy as it gets, with satellite extenders that automatically join the mesh as soon as you plug them in.

That makes the Deco W7200 an outstanding value, and the first mesh router I'd point most people towards if they're in need of something new.

(Editor's note, Jan. 13: The Deco W7200 is currently out of stock on Walmart's website -- in the meantime, you could also consider the Deco X68, which costs $280 for a 2-pack on Amazon. I haven't tested it, but it boasts identical specs to the Deco W7200 and the same design, as well.)

Read our TP-Link Deco W7200 review.

 

Ry Crist/CNET

It isn't as fully featured as systems that cost more, and it doesn't support Wi-Fi 6 -- but aside from that, the budget-friendly, AC1200 version of the Netgear Orbi mesh router stands out as a clear value pick in the mesh category. Currently down to just $92 for a three-device setup with the Wi-Fi router and two satellite extenders, it's about as inexpensive as mesh routers come, and it kept up with both Nest Wifi and the Wi-Fi 5 version of Amazon's Eero mesh router in our speed tests.

In fact, of those three systems, Netgear Orbi clocked in with the fastest average top speed at close range -- and when we put that range to the test with smart devices at the CNET Smart Home, it edged those two Wi-Fi systems out with a faster router speed once again. I even like the design, with clever contours on top that vent out heat in style.

Read our Netgear Orbi review.

 

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Starting at $700 for the two-piece setup seen here, the AX6000 version of the Netgear Orbi is far more expensive than the dual-band version listed above, but it's also a lot more powerful. With a second 5GHz band serving as a dedicated backhaul for system transmissions between the router and its satellites and full support for Wi-Fi 6, the system is still our top-tested mesh router, with the best scores in both our lab-based top speed tests and our at-home mesh coverage tests.

In the latter round of tests at my home, where my fiber internet connection tops out at 300Mbps, the Orbi AX600 returned average speeds of 289Mbps to Wi-Fi 5 devices and 367Mbps to Wi-Fi 6 devices, including speeds at the farthest point from the router that were 95% as fast as when connecting up close. That's a near perfect result, and one that no other mesh system I've tested has been able to match.

Is that sort of speedy performance worth $700? I think most will find better value with something less expensive -- and you've got a growing number of solid options that fit the bill. Still, if you're buying right now and you want elite mesh performance, price be damned, then this is the system to get.

Read our Netgear Orbi 6 review.

 

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Gaming routers promise high performance and low latency for die-hard gamers, and it isn't uncommon to find them selling for $300 or even $400. At about $250, the Asus RT-AX86U dual-band router isn't inexpensive either, but it's a strong value relative to routers like those -- and the performance it delivers is flat-out great.

Most noteworthy is the router's latency management. In fact, it leads all of the routers I've ever tested, gaming or otherwise, with the lowest average latency across all of my tests, which online gamers will definitely appreciate. Something else you'll appreciate: An excellent mix of app-based controls and features, including a mobile boost mode, that lets you prioritize gaming traffic to your phone at the touch of a button.

Gaming features aside, the RT-AX86U offers full support for Wi-Fi 6, with strong, stable speeds and good range. If you need additional range, you can add other Asus "AIMesh" devices to your home network to make it the centerpiece of a mesh.

That checks off all of the boxes that most people want from a good gaming router, and it gets you there at a price that isn't too painful for us to recommend. Even if you aren't a gamer, this is still one of the best Wi-Fi 6 routers you can buy right now.

Read our list of the best gaming routers.

 

Watch this: Ways to speed up your Wi-Fi

Router FAQs

I'll post the answer to commonly asked router questions below -- if you have any others, feel free to reach out on Twitter (@rycrist), or by clicking the little envelope icon on my CNET profile page. Doing so will let you send a message straight to my inbox.

What does a Wi-Fi router do?

You need to be connected to your modem in order to send and receive data from the web -- your router lets you do that without need for a wire. It's basically a big, fancy antenna for your modem that lets you connect with it wirelessly, over Wi-Fi. You can also use that local Wi-Fi network to connect with other devices at home, like printers or remote storage servers.

How much should I spend on a router?

It depends on what you need and how many people and devices need to connect, but a small- to medium-sized home or apartment can probably get by with a well-tested dual-band router in the $100 range. If your home is larger, then it's probably worth spending more on a mesh system that can spread more consistent speeds from room to room. And if you're working from home, gaming online or sharing bandwidth with multiple housemates or family members, upgrading to something like a high-speed tri-band router is probably a good investment, too.

How do I set up a Wi-Fi router?

The old-fashioned way is to plug the thing in and connect it with your modem via Ethernet cable, then type its IP address into a browser's URL bar to begin the setup. The easier, more modern way is to use the router's app, which will typically walk you through setup in about 5-10 minutes. After setup, you can also use either approach to access the router's settings or change your Wi-Fi password.

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