X

Rich hippies rejoice: Tesla Model X now $3,000 cheaper

You can thank the slow march of time for this price drop.

Tim Stevens/Roadshow

Early adopters are always taking a risk, whether it's spending time and effort on unproven technology or being willing to pay more to access something sooner. Patience, though, has its rewards, as is the case with the Tesla Model X.

All eyes are on the Model 3 right now, but late last week, Tesla silently dropped the price of its electric SUV by $3,000, bringing the window sticker for a base Model X 75D from $82,500 to $79,500. That puts the five-seater's price just $5,000 above a comparably equipped Model S 75D.

Tesla Model X on the inside and out

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The inexorable march of time is the reason for the price drop. Tesla told Electrek that the price is now lower because Model X production has increased its efficiency and margins are increasing. Instead of just pocketing all that extra cash, Tesla used at least some of it to lower the car's base price.

The Model X is now being produced at full clip, alongside the Model S at Tesla's facility in Fremont, California. There are also a bunch of testers and display models at Tesla stores all across the country, so buyers are able to check them out in person before committing. Both of these factors should help increase the Model X's sales figures even further.

Tesla also made its $5,000 Premium Package standard on the high-end Model S and Model X P100D trims. This package includes a heated steering wheel, a new audio system and a HEPA air filtration system with the silly "Bioweapon Defense Mode."

Tesla is constantly tweaking its lineup and pricing structure. Back in March, the company announced it would discontinue its 60-kWh vehicle trim, which was really just a 75-kWh car with a portion of its battery capacity hidden behind a paywall. Apparently many buyers just upgraded their 60-kWh cars after purchase anyhow.

Inside Tesla Fremont

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on August 7, 2017 at 6:57 AM PDT

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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