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The iPhone 8 Plus has a dual-lens camera, like its predecessor, the 7 Plus. 

Óscar Gutiérrez/CNET

An Israeli startup has accused Apple of using its dual-camera technology without permission.

In  a lawsuit, Corephotonics says Apple wasn't authorized to use its patented tech in the iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone 8 Plus. The suit, reported eaerlier by Reuters, was filed in federal court in San Jose on Monday.

The Tel Aviv-based company alleges that it talked to Apple about partnering, but the tech giant ultimately passed on licensing the tech.

"Apple's lead negotiator expressed contempt for Corephotonics' patents, telling [CEO] Dr. Mendlovic and others that even if Apple infringed, it would take years and millions of dollars in litigation before Apple might have to pay something," the complaint says. Corephotonics is seeking damages, but didn't specify an amount. 

Neither Apple nor Corephotonics immediately returned a request for comment.

Apple introduced dual-lens camera tech in its iPhone 7 Plus model last year, but it isn't the only phone maker offering such a setup. Other devices include the Samsung Note 8, the Moto Z2 Force, LG's V30 and the OnePlus 5. And the feature goes back at least as far as 2011, when it was included in the HTC Evo 3D.

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