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Your Wi-Fi conflicts with my wireless home interfaces

by 2143436756292931057199946 / November 19, 2006 10:59 PM PST

In response to many others topics on wifi stealing and so forth.

How about the fact that sometimes people's wifi bandwiths will conflict with each other, forcing an individual to change the channel of their wireless network.

(As this had happen in my current home. My wireless networking was sluggish at times, but when I changed its channel, it became much faster. This of course doesn't bother me, as I had to simply change the wireless channel...)

But if you're gonne sue me for invading your wifi that is unproteced and broadcasting in my home... I'm gonna sue you for nearly forcing me to change the wireless channel of my wifi in my own home... in order for our wireless networks to co-exist

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So wait...
by dro0001 / November 19, 2006 11:43 PM PST

You want to sue because you have to change a channel (spending no extra money mind you) on your system? Yes I'm sure that lawsuit will go real far. What damages will you ask for by being forced to log into your router and change the channel. Two totally separate issues, and you can not compare your example to stealing a service from a neighbor.

Now if you want to argue the interference side, I would agree with you that you should be able to force someone who has the wireless systems (pre-N I believe do this) that cause a neighbors system to become totally inoperable. That is unacceptable, however, since the FCC in it's infinite wisdom does not regulate those frequencies, there really isn't much that can be done.

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Exactly
by kellenjb / November 20, 2006 2:31 AM PST
In reply to: So wait...

I think you hit it on the head there. In order to sue you must have some damages to be charging for. I guess you could charge for the waste of your time to change it. But unless you make big bucks this wont equate to much. Even if it took an hour to change the channel (which it shouldn't) and you say your time is worth $100 an hour (looking at an extreme here) you would be suing someone for $100 while they are charging you for stealing and then going along with defensorfortis' logic they could charge for their time wasted on a slow internet because you were slowing down.

paintguru, you also got it right with the FCC having no regulations for the traffic. I think regulating this traffic could help tons (despite the fact that everyone hates being regulated).

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My Defense
by 2143436756292931057199946 / November 21, 2006 11:21 PM PST

...I shouldn't have used the word "sue."

I agree with what you both said.

I was trying to open another point-of-view on the matter that if some owner is gonna get upset over the fact your using their unprotected wifi which is broadcasted in someone else's home in comparison to those signals being broadcasted that interfere with your own wireless network?

Well, I don't plan on sueing anybody and a simple channel change on the router fixed my problem.

But I didn't know about that Pre-N information. HHmm... interesting.

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Wow, that's really ...
by vector313 / November 24, 2006 12:44 AM PST

umm, im thinking of a word that means NOT SMART.
This is purely apples and oranges.

SSIDs and Encryption are configurable parameters of a technology ... this is a configurable feature that some HUMAN is responsible for enforcing, breaking, etc.

Channel interference is a flaw or drawback in the actual technology and in no way is the fault of anyone that uses a wifi access point. It's simply a limitation of the signals, nobody can help that.

You can't sue people for things that they cannot help. Ok bye.

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I'm not gonna sue anyone.
by 2143436756292931057199946 / November 27, 2006 11:50 PM PST
In reply to: Wow, that's really ...

(ah) I'm not gonna sue anyone. promise. It was bad terminology. *begins to peel an orange*

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