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XP Pro on a netbook?

I don't own a laptop, and don't much want to give up my desktop because I like full size keyboards and so on. However, I'm considering a netbook for use when traveling. My wife gets cranky if I try to use her laptop too much when we're away from home.

The problem is that I need remote access to my employer's web site. They require Win XP Pro. I think it has something to do with how they have Citrix Server and some associated Java applets set up (Sun Java won't work reliably with the remote access) but I really don't know what the details are. One irony in this is that my office PC has Win XP Pro with Sun Java, not MS Java. But of course I don't need Citrix Server when I'm at work.

So far all the netbooks I have seen run either Win XP Home or some version of Vista.

Any suggestions for a Win XP Pro netbook?

I wonder whether Win 7 and it's XP mode will be an option in a few months but I don't know whether netbooks will have the hardware required to use that Win 7 feature.

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Using XP Mode on

In reply to: XP Pro on a netbook?

Win7 requires some form of virtualisation, of which only certain variety of Intel and AMD processor has, and most (if not all) netbooks doesn't have that, thus, you will have to reconsider either

1) dual boot xp with Win7 (when Win7 becomes the default OS installed on Microsoft-based netbooks)
2) consider non-netbooks (12" and above with VT in it).

However, what are the factors leading you to consider netbook initially and will you consider larger size laptops (with some, bigger price tag)?

Installing Win XP Pro as an upgrade from Home edition is fine, but I have yet to see any manufacturer offering Pro edition for it though. You may have to obtain a personal copy of it to install.

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It does not absolutely HAVE to be a netbook

In reply to: Using XP Mode on

I knew that running XP mode on Win 7 might not be possible. I can always hope that my employer eventually moves up from XP Pro but any change is unlikely as long as Microsoft does not force the issue. I had XP at home for several years before we upgraded to XP at work.

Since I'm interested in a laptop for use for light work away from home I don't really need a large screen, high processing power, a built-in optical drive and so on. I would mostly use it for email and web browsing. I suppose I might try to stream Netflix content but that would depend on the connection speed. In my experience, hotel WiFi bandwidth has not always been too good.

Anyway, the portability and low cost of netbooks is what is driving my interest. I could consider a larger notebook if necessary. If I have to buy an upgrade license to get XP Pro then that would significantly affect the economics.

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About Win 7, XP mode and EM64T

In reply to: XP Pro on a netbook?

http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sSpec=SLG9Y

Ok, this is just one of a dozen Atom CPUs that will have EM64T. NO ONE should tell you yes or no but ask you to answer which machine you have to work with or tell you to do your research.

Back to XP Pro.

Let's say you handed me a netbook with XP Home and need XP Pro. All I would need is the netbook, then I uninstall the antivirus, firewall and in short all added security softwares since we must give MSFT's installer a clear road to get to all files.

Now I plug in my USB DVDRW drive and wait for the netbook to find it. I'll have logged into XP HOME with my administrator capable account and then I slip in my full retail copy of XP Pro SP3 and take it's offer to upgrade the installed OS.

Done. Only 2 or 3 hundred bucks for XP Pro but we can do this. In fact this is how it was done recently.
Bob
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These are

In reply to: About Win 7, XP mode and EM64T

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I thought I covered that?

In reply to: These are

I pointed out that there is no yes or no answer and we have to research if our Atom can do this?

Thanks for the added notes and links.

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Alas, I had hoped it was simpler ... and cheaper ...

In reply to: About Win 7, XP mode and EM64T

I assumed that the XP Pro upgrade disc could be used, but that does add a good bit to the admission price.

The other question that I've wondered about is whether the resources required for XP Home and XP Pro are similar. IOW, is there a reason other than the perceived target market for the fact that most of the netbooks come with the home version as opposed to the Pro version?

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You could do that.

In reply to: Alas, I had hoped it was simpler ... and cheaper ...

Sorry, I was sharing the method I use at the office. I'm sure that XP pro will be available for a price.
Bob

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I recently upgraded 30 netbooks

In reply to: Alas, I had hoped it was simpler ... and cheaper ...

from Home to Pro for a school using a volume licensed copy of XP Pro upgrade. Of course you wouldn't be using this particular offering but the upgrade disk worked fine here. There is no noticeable performance change. I can tell you of one annoyance you may encounter with a netbook that's not used regularly (and this goes for any PC, actually). You'll have AV, anti-spyware and such installed that will have scheduled scan times. If you set these to run missed scans and updates at startup, you'll find yourself waiting for what seems like an eternity for these machines to finish their background processes if it's been a while since they've been used. You'll also want to lean out the number of startup items in general. Laptops tend to loaded with non-critical ones. They are, for us, a nice alternative to a full sized laptop to take traveling but I'd charge them up and let them update themselves right before hitting the road. The OS version...Home or Pro...won't be the bottleneck.

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30 upgrades? Sounds tedious ...

In reply to: I recently upgraded 30 netbooks

I wish the whole upgrade process were much simpler but that is another subject.

I don't usually set my PCs to catch up on missed scans when they boot. At home I encourage folks to leave them on at night at least some of the time so the scans and updates don't get too far behind, but waiting for a scan at boot is painful.

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Not as tedious as it sounds

In reply to: 30 upgrades? Sounds tedious ...

With volume licensing there's no dealing with activation issues so you can fully configure one PC and clone the rest. But I do want to relay that our experience with using a netbook for travel purposes has been quite positive. My wife and I recently found ourselves traveling separately and she took the device with her. My laptop is company owned and configured to only work using their VPN...bummer. I may consider buying another netbook but want to see what's going to happen with Win 7 and if of the graphics deficiencies will be addressed. But, for the price of XP Home + an XP Pro upgrade disk, you may find a small and more capable laptop. It will come with Vista but might offer either a Win 7 upgrade or an XP Pro downgrade.

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I remembered something ...

In reply to: Not as tedious as it sounds

I'm not sure but it is possible I have an XP Pro upgrade license available from a machine that I removed from service. If the disc is still in my pile of stuff it would be from the original release or possibly SP1. If I were to install an XP Pro upgrade that old over a fully upgraded XP Home would there be any predictable problems other than the need to install the relevant security updates?

I'm wondering both about the question of whether an old version of XP Pro would support all of the internals for a new machine as well as the question of whether installing an older version would create any weirdness.

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Simple enough to resolve

In reply to: I remembered something ...

You can "slipstream" SP3 into your older XP Pro Upgrade disk. Actually, you're an .iso file to burn to new media. It won't contain updates since SP3 was released but these are easy enough to recover. I've done such numerous times without experiencing any weirdness. You'll need to use the key code that came with the upgrade disk and hope that MS doesn't recognize it or a phone call might be necessary. I'm presuming the issue you're trying to resolve has something to do with joining a domain. Home won't do that but Pro will.

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I'll go with no.

In reply to: I remembered something ...

XP even when slipstreamed with SP3 has shown its true colors and heritage by failing to install to boot volumes over 127GB in size. The slipstream doesn't seem to change some core items such as the installer.

If you are lucky to have an XP SP1 or XP SP2 as the original CD then you fair much better.
Bob

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What about this ....

In reply to: I'll go with no.

I'm pretty sure I have an XP Pro SP2 install disk from one of the PCs I still use. What happens if I use THAT install disk but put in the product key for the older XP install that is no longer in use?

Would that get around the disk size limit? Or would the installer recognize that the product key is from a different install disk?

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I can't know that.

In reply to: What about this ....

Those CDs that come with PCs can be rigged with code to lock them to specific machines. I can't know if that is an issue or not. You would roll the dice here.
Bob

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I wasn't thinking about an OEM install disk ...

In reply to: I can't know that.

I was thinking about doing that with a retail XP Pro upgrade disk. I couldn't use the activation code off of the newer install if it is still in use but could I use the activation code off of the pre-SP1 XP Pro retail upgrade after I installed with a newer upgrade disk? Worst case scenarios: (1) it won't work and I have to go buy a new upgrade disk; or (2) it works but won't activate and I have to buy a license code that comes without installation media. Or did I miss an even worse scenario?

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It's no worse than a minefield.

In reply to: I wasn't thinking about an OEM install disk ...

You may think that you would know in advance but as soon as you mix CDs and CDKEYs all bets are off.
Bob

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Oh well.

In reply to: It's no worse than a minefield.

If I do this, then I guess I'll have to bite the bullet and purchase XP Pro AGAIN (I've got 6 licenses, and I'm only using 3 - but all the install media I can find are either pre-SP1 or else OEM, presumably BIOS locked)

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Just remembered how we can test this ahead of time.

In reply to: It's no worse than a minefield.

Go install Virtual Box on ANY machine. Now install that CD of XP you have and feed it the CD-Key but unplug from the internet to see if it accepts the CD-Key. If you get that far then it's 99.99% sure it will activate.

And you can delete the Virtual Box after the test.
Bob

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Wouldn't try that

In reply to: What about this ....

Check the volume label of you upgrade disk against this listing.

http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm?ttid=283

If you're at SP1 or higher, you're good. If not, I believe the 127 gb limit revolves around the version of atapi.sys that's being installed and, as such, should be correctable if need be.

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Thanks

In reply to: I recently upgraded 30 netbooks

I joined this forum today in the hope of fining exactly what you offer, and I thank you for it. I apologize for not knowing how it would route and/or id my request, but hope this is what you mean by your preferred approach.

Anyway, everything you did, even to the type and number of machines, is exactly what I want to do! Did you also do all of the network linking to the server with the first unit and then mirror it onto the other machines as part of the process, or have to prepare each unit separately for connection to the network server? Thank yo very much for your great assistance.

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We're not that sophisticated

In reply to: Thanks

We've no way to broadcast/deploy an image over the network. It was done one machine at a time from an image on an external drive and over the course of several evenings. I had to do BIOS updates and configurations as well. I love volunteer work. The pay isn't great but the job security is wonderful. My initial concern about doing this was that the netbooks all came with their own product ID codes but the codes didn't match what was embedded in the installation. I was afraid that trying to upgrade to XP pro with the volume licensed disk which had another PID code was going to cause licensing confusion. It didn't seem to matter. I'm also not sure why XP Pro was suggested as I though Home would have been fine for the intended purpose of the netbooks. But, I don't make the decisions or write the checks. Good luck.

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Just another FYI. This is the thread where I first

In reply to: Thanks

posted my concern.

http://forums.cnet.com/5208-19688_102-0.html?messageID=3079363&tag=posts;tree#3079363

I wasn't happy about needing to do the XP Pro upgrade. I thought Home should be fine. Although I like Pro much better, these were going to be used by students only so there weren't going to be a lot of accounts to deal with. CDW-G, at first, didn't send the right disk. They sent a full version of the volume licensed software. I had to dig to fine that an upgrade version existed and tell them what we needed if we were going to upgrade rather than do a complete scratch installation.

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I recently upgraded 30 netbooks

In reply to: I recently upgraded 30 netbooks

Why all this trouble of antivirus etc. Seems schools still have to much funding despite what is being said in the news media.
Why not just make it a dualboot with Linux?

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Yes, there are indeed netbooks with XP Pro

In reply to: XP Pro on a netbook?

The Acer Aspire One P531h-1791 comes with XP Pro SP3 installed. Here are the remaining specs: Acer Aspire One 531h, Intel Atom Processor N270 (512KB L2 cache, 1.60GHz, 533MHz FSB), 2GB DDR2 SDRAM, 160GB hard drive, Genuine Windows XP Pro (SP3), 6 Hour Battery Life (6 Cell Lithium Ion), 10.1-Inch WSVGA (1024 x 600) TFT LCD, Acer CrystalBrite Technology, Integrated Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 950. It's a nicely loaded little system. I had recommended it for a friend and so got to check it out and image it for safekeeping before we booted it the first time. It's a dandy little system after you get done swearing about the under-sized keyboard (endemic to the breed). My only complaints were 1) very poor color control/rendition with the built-in Web-cam and 2) when you position the screen for optimum viewing angle, the Web-cam only sees the top of your head. Oh, sure, I want a standard keyboard in half the space and a higher resolution screen with a built-in 2000-lumen screen projector, but this little puppy will be great while I'm waiting for miracles. I'm about to order one for myself. It even comes with a decent maintenance partition and system image to restore it to its as-delivered state. My own advice would be to make your own image on an external drive with your own imaging tools but the built-in image and tools are the most convenient and next-best solution possible -- also great if you're on the road when you need to refresh it. You can find it on Amazon by searching for <Acer Aspire One P531h>.

I just noticed another Acer netbook model with XP Pro, the AO751h-1196, with an 11.1" screen and otherwise similar specs (maxed-out) including the essential 6-cell battery pack. For about $80 more, I might just give that one a try instead and see how it stacks up against my friend's P531h.

Enjoy (XP Pro)!

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Maybe this could help

In reply to: XP Pro on a netbook?

The majority of the netbook now are coming with Windows 7 Starter. In any case you want to wipe your drive and install (downgrade to) Windows XP, here's a step-by-step video that could help you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q-Dt1EeCHM

Hopefully that helped!

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