Question

Windows 7 64 bit NEW video problem

Jul 2, 2018 4:19AM PDT

I have a new problem which I have searched for on the internet and can’t find a solution.
I consider this the worst scenario and that it is intermittent.
So if I try this that and the other supposed fix I am never going to know if it’s worked successfully.
The only way out of this that I can think of is to somehow run some interrogation software that will identify the problem and then I can work towards a suitable fix.
Right the problem;
I can be working away quite happily then all of a sudden the video just disappears, i.e. if I am playing my music video or just music or watching a documentary on YouTube, they both continue in sound only.
Go figure.
I will tell you what I have done so far;
I have stripped out everything i.e. leads, memory etc. etc. and then re-seated, the only thing that I have not touched is the cpu / heat sink & fan I have left that in situ.
I have undertaken various scans, with various third party sites, and a deep scan in “Safe Mode”.
The only other thing that might or might not be relevant is that when I boot up, along the top left hand side of my “Acer monitor” I get a series of looks like green dots but then after a period of time they disappear and it boots normally, while this is happening it is a black screen not blue.
Something else that may be of value is that my original boot time from switch on to desktop was circa 50 seconds and then ready to start.
This has now progressed circa two minutes and the only thing that I have running in “Services” is as follows;
1. Kaspersky Anti-Virus Service 19.0.0
The other two ticked items in “Services”
• Klvssbridge64_19.0.0
• Malwarebytes Service
Both of these are shown as “stopped”
In start up the only thing ticked is “Smart RAM”
On the general tab it is configured to the following;
• Selective start up
• Load system services
• Load start up items
My system details are as follows;
Widows 7 Professional 64 bit Service pack 1
Intel Core 2 Q8300 @ 2.50GHz
8 GB installed RAM
Motherboard
ASUSTeK Computer
P5E3 Premium
BIOS American Megatrends 0803
Graphics Interface PCI-Express
Graphics
NVIDIA GeForce GT 430
EVGA Corp
Memory 1024 Mbytes
DDR3

In “Device Manager” it shows absolutely no yellow exclamation marks what so ever.
Any comments please would be appreciated.
Tony

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Comments
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Answer
Re: video problem
Jul 2, 2018 4:26AM PDT

It could very well be a hardware issue with your graphic card.

Things you can try to confirm that option:
1. Boot from a Linux disc or stick (free to make) and go and view Youtube.
2. Replace the graphic card.

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In answer to Kees_B
Jul 2, 2018 6:02AM PDT

Thanks for your potential help
I don't see how using a Linux disc / stick will help especially as I am running "Widows 7 Professional 64 bit Service pack 1"
The graphics card is on-board.
Thanks anyway

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Re: Linux
Jul 2, 2018 6:15AM PDT

If a certain error occurs both in Linux and in Windows, it's practically sure it's not a Windows issue. That's a big help.

I'm even inclined to tell Linux users with strange problems - that might be hardware related - to boot to a Windows-to-go stick. But since most Linux users hate Windows, I don't think they would do that. The other way around is more common.

If it happens to be the onboard graphic card, it's not "replace the" but "add a".

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Answer
Speccy
Jul 2, 2018 7:33AM PDT
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Answer
Nod to Kees advice.
Jul 3, 2018 1:44PM PDT

That's one old GPU. Just sharing my old C2Q looks to be getting a new 1050 Ti. Why? Last hurrah upgrade without breaking the bank or getting a new PSU.

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Windows 7 64 bit NEW video problem
Jul 3, 2018 4:02PM PDT

I seem to be missing something here, please help;
R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 3, 2018 1:44 PM PDT
In reply to: Windows 7 64 bit NEW video problem
That's one old GPU. Just sharing my old C2Q looks to be getting a new 1050 Ti. Why? Last hurrah upgrade without breaking the bank or getting a new PSU.
How does the above solve my problem

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It is sharing a few points.
Jul 3, 2018 4:27PM PDT

There are folk that demand a fix short of swapping out the OS or hardware. They want a "click here" fix that doesn't involve repair or work.

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Windows 7 64 bit NEW video problem
Jul 4, 2018 11:07AM PDT
In response to;
R. Proffitt Forum moderator / July 3, 2018 4:27 PM PDT
In reply to: Windows 7 64 bit NEW video problem
There are folk that demand a fix short of swapping out the OS or hardware. They want a "click here" fix that doesn't involve repair or work.
First and foremost I am not one of those people.
The machine that you see above is what I built from an empty case.
So for me to " swapping out the OS or hardware" would mean a new motherboard and reinstalling a new OS.
Sorry I think NOT
When I get some time I am going to run "Speccy's idea of CCleaner, the things is I Skype twice a day and if it runs over then I am reduced to one of my laptops.
Then there is the British Grand Prix so I am thinking it will be from Monday onwards . . . . . . . .
Watch this space.
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I didn't explain at lenght.
Jul 4, 2018 11:21AM PDT

Why? Because the machine is pretty dated along with that GPU. I do help a lot of family, neighbors now that I no long own a shop (sold it!) So I will share what is most likely at fault. That GPU is old enough I'd try another. At the old shop we'd swap in a shop card and test.

Can you do that?

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PS. Did you try the advice so far?
Jul 4, 2018 11:25AM PDT

I boot up a Linux distro (no install, read example at http://tips.oncomputers.info/archives2004/0401/2004-Jan-11.htm ) in order to sniff out hardware issues if I don't have spare cards.

Also, a nod to DDU to clean out all graphic drivers to install "the one."
And finally at that age you know to replace all heatsink compound and have a spotless PC.

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Answer
Uninstall graphics drivers, reboot have windows find drivers
Jul 5, 2018 7:53PM PDT

I had the same issue a while ago after a windows update - I tracked it down to the graphics driver. I had been updating my NVIDIA graphics card drivers using GEForce Experience. However, MS/Windows was not happy with the most up to date drivers. Windows provided an older version as an optional update after I uninstalled the drivers and rebooted and ran Windows Update. Note when you uninstall them and reboot, you get default low resolution VGA drivers, right click on the desktop select screen resolution and pick a resolution you can work with to run Windows update, install the driver version Windows suggests and then reboot. Worked for me. I have Win 7 x64 Ultimate and a GeForce GTX 1060 graphics card, but I had the issue with an older GeForce card as well. Windows gave me driver version 391.35, which is NOT the most recent version from NVIDIA. This incompatibility only happened to me twice in my 9 years of using Win 7, but when it happens it is havoc.

Good luck.

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