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Windows 10 free upgrade: Should I go for it or not?

Windows 10 free upgrade: Should I go for it or not?

Since Windows 10 is coming out soon and I believe it is a free upgrade for people using Windows 7 and 8, I think, please correct me if I'm wrong. I'm currently on Windows 7 and happy with it. But since it's a free upgrade, should I get it? How would I know if all my programs will be compatible with Windows 10 and if my hardware is compatible? I'm kind of on the fence about it. My classmate tells me never to upgrade operating systems until it is released for a while since there will be bugs and to let the company work out most of the bugs before buying. However, since this time it is a free upgrade, I'm tempted to upgrade when it is available at no cost. Am I crazy for doing this or should I hold off and pay for it later? What would you do in my situation? Are you doing the free upgrade? Looking forward to reading your advice and suggestions! Thank you.

--Submitted by: Marlon C.
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We are all beta testers

In reply to: Windows 10 free upgrade: Should I go for it or not?

With Microsoft every release is always filled with bugs. We who purchase Microsoft's products are the beta tester pool that Microsoft rely on. Rather than release a fully baked product Microsoft and others are always in need of more cash. So, they release beta products and hope you will not notice and keep buying their products. As an example Microsoft Outlook install wipes out your computer's spell checker ability. One would like to believe that Microsoft would release a patch after so many people contacted them about the problem. This isn't the case and Microsoft has taken a head in the sand approach to fixing most bugs. In the spell checker case, it was Microsoft Outlook that created the problem and support was directing people to purchase a separate stand alone software to fix their glitch. Why should customers pay for software, because Microsoft failed to properly bug check their release? Since we are all just beta testers then the software should be free.
The Windows 10 beta testers have had many issues with the new release and many have expressed their issues in the beta tester forum, but their issues in many cases fell on deaf ears at Microsoft. Now, XP and Windows 7 are very stable products. Why not just revamp the old instead of building new buggy software? I don't want my cell phone to have the same software as my pc. The main reason is theft or lost phone. Now any crook has direct access to all of my data, photos,payment options, and even my address. I also do not want Microsoft to collect data about me, to sell me or sell my data to anyone paying for such data. I do not want ad's geared to my interests. The new Windows 8 and Windows 10 will be nothing short of a computer spying ring and filled with tons of bugs. Thank You NSA!

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MS Code Words

In reply to: We are all beta testers

-Alpha = ROFLOL
-Beta final release = alpha pre release
-Release = Beta
-Service Pk1 = Bug fixes that we were working on when released
-Service Pk2 = Bug fixes that showed up after Service Pk1
-Service Pk3 = Bug fixes introduced by Service Pk2 fix for Service Pk1 (kernel recompile)
-NEW OS RELEASE = Forget the remaining bugs. There's so few of them that most people might get used to not having an OS that does wierd things and there are too many non MS developers writing apps for it so lets just reboot so everyone can start over where we have the inside advantage again.

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In for a penny...

In reply to: We are all beta testers

No doubt we will be doing the app support for MS.
Their only job is finding enough forum information on Google to fix their bugs.

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Bugs

In reply to: In for a penny...

That's why they have a technical preview. A consumer testing assures the testing on thousands of hardware configurations.

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So , We have options

In reply to: We are all beta testers

You wrote...
"The new Windows 8 and Windows 10 will be nothing short of a computer spying ring and filled with tons of bugs. Thank You NSA! "

If your so worried about security, we have options for free to use .
How about tails > https://tails.boum.org/
Digger

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He's right - we have alternatives

In reply to: So , We have options

Never heard of tails, but Linux OS's are as stable as Windows 8 and far easier to use. You can also choose your desktop interface and configure most of them to suit yourself. (KDE is the most like Windows, Gnome Classic/ Fallback more like Mack, and stay away from the Ubuntu Unity interface unless you have a new gaming computer.) One point I tried to make above and wasn't that clear with, is that Windows Updates have changed even Windows 7 into something no longer reliably more stable and easier to use than Ubuntu Linux.

Someone who doesn't do much with a computer beyond e-mail, web browsing, a few basic computer games, spreadsheets and word processing, maybe a favorite genealogy program, maybe some basic image editing, playing dvds and so forth, would be completely happy with one of the Ubuntu distros. Kubuntu most closely resembles Windows. Lubuntu and Xubuntu are better for older operating systems, though one tends to have to install more. And most commonly used software is free. The only software I am running in a windows emulator is my genealogy software and my favorite games.

Once upon a time it could be hard to get a Linux operating system going on a computer, but these days usually one doesn't have to install any drivers, and if one does it is likely to be for video card and wireless networking. The software to support your mother board, for the NIC adapter, etc., is not needed. And while I've jumped through a few hoops with drivers, usually getting a more Linux-friendly device, I've yet to compile one.

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The problem is

In reply to: He's right - we have alternatives

the ones that use a computer for nothing beyond email, web browsing and the other stuff you mentioned are the least likely to even know what Linux is let alone acquire it. Those users are probably not the ones on these forums. It's hard to even find a Linux machine. If you go to Dell's page where they sale some Linux machines right on the same page it says Dell recommends Windows.

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Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

In reply to: We are all beta testers

I will make and image backup, restore it to a hd and make sure it works, before I try the upgrade. Microsoft does everything it can to make this impossible, and thus make their OS toys, not serious os we can depend on.

Win8 can't even search correctly. I misses even files in the user directly is is never supposed to miss. You have to turn off the indexing and then it's way slower than winxp.

All the new windows are designed as money extraction systems. They are advertising system on computers.

My guess is win10 will be even worse.

Win7 would be great, but it can shut you out of your system if someone else uses you key, I have had it happen.

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Here we added Classic Shell

In reply to: Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

All good again. In fact quite stable compared to 7 at the office.

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DISLIKE WINDOWS 8; LOVE Classic Shell!

In reply to: Here we added Classic Shell

Yes, Classic Shell works very well and I don't have to deal with the "apps" of Windows 8!

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WINDOWS 8 AND THE APPS

In reply to: DISLIKE WINDOWS 8; LOVE Classic Shell!

Suddenly my Apps don't work anymore. I even called Microsoft, they spent 2 hours trying to fix it. And could not. I really dislike Windows 8 and I just work with classic shell

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Classic shell?

In reply to: DISLIKE WINDOWS 8; LOVE Classic Shell!

I hate to sound like an oxymoron, but what is the classic shell?

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Re: Classic Shell

In reply to: Classic shell?

Let me quote myself from a few posts below:

Classic Shell (from http://www.classicshell.net/ ) is well-known (on these forums anyway) and much used software to make Windows 8 look more like Windows 7. It's especially useful for the original Windows 8 on non-touchscreen devices, but certainly can be used with 8.1 also.

Kees

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Care to even tell us what you are talking about.

In reply to: Here we added Classic Shell

Excuse me, do you happen to want to specify what you are talking about?

The only "Classic shell" I am aware of is Ubuntu Linux's gnome classic shell.

If you're by any chance talking about a mis-named feature in a desperate effort to fool people into associating Windows 10 with Linux feature (another is a "software center" or "app center" for installing Firefox), now, for exactly how long have you run Windows 10. running it since last night doesn't prove it is stable - that takes months of experience plus what happens when you upgrade to 10.1. It was upgrading from 8 to 8.1 that caused some of my IT classmates to need to do a complete new install, and the teacher said so did huge numbers of people. Stable indeed!

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I googled Classic Shell.

In reply to: Care to even tell us what you are talking about.

And Shan likes it so my guess it's a new title you didn't know about. If you want to share our office experience with 8, sure, it's been far better than expected, after we added Classic Shell.

Maybe we can start a new thread about this?

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Re: Classic Shell

In reply to: Care to even tell us what you are talking about.

Classic Shell (from http://www.classicshell.net/ ) is well-known (on these forums anyway) and much used software to make Windows 8 look more like Windows 7. It's especially useful for the original Windows 8 on non-touchscreen devices, but certainly can be used with 8.1 also. Are you saying that none of your classmates use it?

Bob wasn't talking about Windows 10, he was replying to a post about Windows 8. I even doubt if he installed Windows 10 already on one of his PC's. Could be he has better things to do than being an unpaid tester for Microsoft.
Since it's so clear from the context he wasn't talking about Windows 10, let me remark that for a succesfull career in IT you not only need to have programming compentencies, but reading compentencies also. Failing to understand the finer details of what your clients write might make you programming the wrong functionality.

it's quite doubtful, by the way, if there will ever be a Windows 10.1 that you mentioned, or even a Windows 11. Microsoft is changing to a more continuous development and release path, with long term support versions and branches (with less changes) for company use.

Kees

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I'll admit that on 10.

In reply to: Re: Classic Shell

While I didn't install it on any of my gear, I see 10 plenty because folk love to try things like that.

I'm also very lucky in that our office only banned 8 for a short while until we could get a handle on a few issues. Client Shell handily addressed what we needed plus we can't dismiss the market. That is, our clients will be buying Windows 8.x machines so we must test and adjust to that or risk losing our clients. For us, it worked out well and in doing so learned more about why some go up in flames over 8. After the initial changes all is well now.

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Will get 10, because I'll need to support it

In reply to: I'll admit that on 10.

As a tech guy, I will run into windows 10. That's the only reason I got windows 8.1, and didn't wipe it with Ubuntu or Linux Mint immediately. Plus I has touchscreen. BEING a tech person I also know to expect some weird sh!+ and that's all part of my training to help others. All in all, interface quirks aside, windows 8.1 hasn't really been that bad!

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Wow!

In reply to: Care to even tell us what you are talking about.

Seems like "Classic Shell" went completely over your head. It's been long known on these forums.
Dafydd.

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Someone else uses your key?

In reply to: Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

It is not possible for someone else to use your key if you keep control of the case and the dvd that your OS came on. If you're that careless and casual, Windows 10 will probably suit you just fine.

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There are Lots of Ways for that to Happen

In reply to: Someone else uses your key?

If your computer came with the OS already on it but was put together by some idiot who is trying to get by with a single copy of the OS, this can happen. It is not likely to be an issue with the CD case or the computer case. Of course, if you change out any of your hardware, your machine will deactivate the OS forcing you to contact Microsoft. That was to make sure people didn't buy one copy of the OS and put it on several computers. Also, changing out OS types can play havoc, such as buying a PC with the OEM OS installed and then reloading Windows from someones DVD which is NOT the same exact thing your system came with. (non-OEM vs. OEM). Then there are those that get a key off some place on the Internet which might be the Volume key which won't work with the OEM software or the DVD-based software.
If you call Microsoft, you'll need to know how you got the OS (OEM? Volume? DVD?) and where you are finding the key. If you changed out part of your hardware, you need to explain that to them.

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You must have Microsoft Outlook installed,

In reply to: Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

looks like you lost your spell checker.... HappyHappySadSadWinkWink

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Search? Never found agreement that any version did that.

In reply to: Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

Microsoft's idea on search is truly an odd area. Worthy of a discussion on its own.

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Search? not if you have several parameters.............

In reply to: Search? Never found agreement that any version did that.

Hear,hear! Bring back the classic search feature that was in WinXP!, at least as an option!

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You Think W 8 Is Bad

In reply to: Some of us are stuck with win8 which is terrible.

I still found W 8 better then W 8.1. However, that isn't saying much. Many of my programs stopped working.

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Cost of ownership

In reply to: We are all beta testers

Before upgrade find out what it will cost to you.
Yes, the upgrade is free for one year. But so many things are free in the beginning and very expensive after that. Remember the Keurig coffee machine. You pay $129 for the machine and have to pay $41 for pound of coffee after that. Or take MS Office 365. It is only $6.99 a month. So after 20 months it costs you more than MS Office Home and Student on DVD.
There was info that part of Windows 10 functions and future upgrades are tied to MS Cloud and the MS said nothing about prices to use the Cloud and final costs for users of free Windows 10..
MS Corp. is not a charity foundation, so it is better to find out what is their business model for Windows 10.

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what are you complaining about?

In reply to: We are all beta testers

You can have the bugs for free too!

"Waiter, what's this fly doing in my soup?!"
"It would seem sir, he's doing the back stroke"

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It's free, so I'm going for it!

In reply to: Windows 10 free upgrade: Should I go for it or not?

Rather than pay the big bucks for a copy after the fact, I am going to take the free upgrade on all my Windows 7 Professional machines. I have an old Toshiba laptop that I bought prior to Windows Vista 's release (10+ years) and it has been running fine on Windows 7 Pro 32-bit. My wife has an older Dell desktop and that is running 7 Pro 32-bit. My daughter has an older HP deaktop running 7 32-bit, and I've got a rather decent older HP developer class desktop (near server-level hardware) that is running 7 Pro 64-bit.

I have run every version of Windows since 3.1 with the exception of any of the "8" versions. Given the fact that it's free, I'm willing to take the plunge now rather than pay for it later. Supposedly there is a hardware compatibility test that is run prior to installation, so that will be the final decision maker, free always sounds good to me!

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Check your hardware

In reply to: It's free, so I'm going for it!

You have some older machines there and despite Microsoft offering the Win10 upgrade to all Win 7 machines, NOT all of them are capable of running it, due to lack of hardware features on the CPU. The minimum hardware requirements are:

1GHz or faster processor with support for PAE, NX, and SSE2
1GB of RAM for 32-bit computing, or 2GB for 64-bit
16GB of hard-drive space (32-bit) or 20GB (64-bit)
A Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM driver

As always, these are minima and bigger configurations are usually recommended. However, a lot of older CPUs do not meet the requirements, particularly the PAE, NX and SSE2 extensions, that, if memory serves, came in at Intel Core 2 and the AMD equivalent, so that Intel Centrino Banias and Sonoma, Pentium 3 and 4 and Core (non 2) processors will not work (yes, I have all these - don't ask!). The processor requirements are the same as Win 8.1, so if your machines are 8.1 capable, the are good to go on 10.

If you want to check what's in your machine, you can use the Microsoft compatibility checkers, which will check your hardware (plug in any USB devices) and software or there is a handy little utility, CPUID CPU-Z (Google it) which will tell you more than you ever wanted to know about your processor!

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Dorasm, Your Post Was Removed..

In reply to: Check your hardware

Religious discussions, no matter how well camouflaged as computer jargon, are off-topic to this forum and therefore against forum policies.. Speakeasy is better for such discussions.

Grif

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