Question

Windows 10 Creator update and jpg file problems

Hi, I updated to the Windows 10 Creator and now I'm getting a "file not found" message every time I click on a thumbnail of a .jpg I want to open. I can open the .jpg in Photoshop Elements, but I can't open it again if I try to rename it and save it. Does anyone know a fix for this? Thanks in advance.

Discussion is locked
Follow
Reply to: Windows 10 Creator update and jpg file problems
PLEASE NOTE: Do not post advertisements, offensive materials, profanity, or personal attacks. Please remember to be considerate of other members. If you are new to the CNET Forums, please read our CNET Forums FAQ. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Reporting: Windows 10 Creator update and jpg file problems
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Comments
- Collapse -
Answer
Do You Mean Shortcut or Thumbnail?

A thumbnail is generally located only where the actual .jpg is situated, such as in the Pictures folder. Turning off "thumbnail view" in that folder will show it in a list or something similar. You should be able to double-click on the actual .jpg file and open it using one of the various viewers installed on the computer. On the other hand, if you're referring to a ".lnk/shortcut" to the .jpg file, then you might see a thumbnail view of the picture but it's not actually the true .jpg file. As such, renaming the shortcut doesn't actually get the job done and picture viewers might get lost. And double clicking on the .lnk file might cause issues if the link no longer points to the correct location. Can you create a new shortcut and does it work now?

So, what is the file extension on the "thumbnail" you're referring to? Is it .jpg picture file and does the file reside in a Picture folder,,,,, or is it a .lnk shortcut file and if you RIGHT click on the file and choose "Properties", then the "shortcut" tab, does the true location of the file reside somewhere else?

Where are these "thumbnails" located in the folder structure?

Hope this helps and let us know more.

Grif

Post was last edited on April 24, 2017 3:14 PM PDT

- Collapse -
Cannot save to - anywhere

There has been a strange, slow creep in Windows 10. First it was my IBM SPSS statistics package that would not save to anywhere, then it happened twice in Excel. I tried a scan disk after a full virus scan (that found nothing) and then tried a reimage repair ... which did not correct the problem, nor did uninstalling both SPSS and Excel, and now it's happening to my when I try to save an image from the web as a .jpeg to - anywhere, with any name given to the file. I have three friends that are watching this move through their systems as well. We've all tried using the Trendmicro Housecall antivirus just to double-check, we've all tried dropping our firewalls. We've all cleared our cookies and cache...and we've tried doing a few rollbacks, but don't seem to have found a date to roll back to that works...

- Collapse -
Not a problemhere

(shhh, linux user)

- Collapse -
No issues here as well.

But in an office with dozens of machines both old and new on W10.

There are new settings I'd like you to check but this is some other member's post so create a new discussion just for you.

I'll note https://www.google.com/search?q=windows+10+protected+folders and write in some cases you have to turn that off.

In parting I worry that OSes today with so many options may be causing users to blame the OS rather than an optional setting.

- Collapse -
Just A Suggestion... Chkdsk

As mentioned further below in this thread:

It seems as though the Windows 10 "upgrade" process may not install all the files correctly, or maybe they're damaged, or maybe something else, but running Chkdsk has fixed quite a few of these minor glitches. Try running Chkdsk in "repair" mode to find any damaged files and correct them. Start by opening a command prompt as an admin. RIGHT click on the Start button, choose "Command Prompt (Admin). (Or type "Command" in the search line, then RIGHT click on the "Command Prompt" listing at the top, choose "Run as admin".) Once there, type chkdsk /f /r /x, leaving the appropriate spaces between the letters as shown, then press the Enter key. You should see a note that it can't be run till a restart is done, type "Y" for yes, then press the Enter key again. Close the command prompt and restart the computer. Chkdsk will run upon restart and will take quite a while to finish.. Don't panic when the progress bar stays at 10% for a long time. It's fairly normal and the Chkdsk process may take a couple of hours.

When it's finished, it will boot to your normal startup/lock screen and you can login normally and then see if things are working correctly again.

Hope this helps.

Grif

Post was last edited on March 14, 2018 7:14 PM PDT

- Collapse -
Answer
And This Seems To Help A Few Such Issues.. Chkdsk

If the thumbnails are the actual .jpg files, then try this:

It seems as though the Windows 10 "upgrade/update" process may not install all the files correctly, or maybe they're damaged, or maybe something else, but running Chkdsk has fixed quite a few of these minor glitches. Try running Chkdsk in "repair" mode to find any damaged files and correct them. Start by opening a command prompt as an admin. RIGHT click on the Start button, choose "Command Prompt (Admin). Once there, type chkdsk /f /r /x, leaving the appropriate spaces between the letters as shown, then press the Enter key. You should see a note that it can't be run till a restart is done, type "Y" for yes, then press the Enter key again. Close the command prompt and restart the computer. Chkdsk will run upon restart and will take quite a while to finish.. Don't panic when the progress bar stays at 10% for a long time. It's fairly normal and the Chkdsk process may take a couple of hours.

When it's finished, it will boot to your normal startup/lock screen and you can login normally and then see if things are working correctly again.

Hope this helps.

Grif

Post was last edited on April 24, 2017 3:26 PM PDT

- Collapse -
Chkdsk

I just tried this. My account is the administrator account on this machine and I've run chkdsk before but this time it tells me that I need to run it in "elevated mode".

- Collapse -
Yep, Do This..

Although there are some computers having issues with Chkdsk after updating to Creators Version, in order to run an elevated command prompt as admin, do it this way: In the search line at the lower left, type in "command" and when it shows up at the top of the search window, RIGHT click on the "Command Prompt" listing, choose "Run as administrator" When the command line opens, type in chkdsk /f /r /x, leaving the appropriate spaces between the letters as shown, then press the Enter key. You should see a note that it can't be run till a restart is done, type "Y" for yes, then press the Enter key again. Close the command prompt and restart the computer. Chkdsk will run upon restart and will take quite a while to finish..

Hope this helps.

Grif

- Collapse -
But You Also Didn't Answer The Earlier Questions

Are the files shortcuts or thumbnails? And where are the files located?

Still, it's a good idea to run Chkdsk.

Grif

Post was last edited on April 24, 2017 8:05 PM PDT

- Collapse -
Earlier questions

I did answer the earlier questions, but in a separate post. The files are in This PC > Pictures

And I get the error message: Cannot find C:\Users\Barb\Pictures\the date\Filename (with whatever date and filename I'd chosen). So it looks to me like it's stored the pictures in one place, but it's looking for them in another, yes?

I'll try chkdsk again. Thanks very much for your help.

- Collapse -
Well, I Doubt The Files Are Actually In "This PC>Pictures"..

...because there is no such "real" location other than when you double click on "This PC" on your desktop, then double click on the "Pictures" folder under "Folders". That's only a library that exists describing shortcuts to the actual location of those folders under your username.. So I'm guessing if you use File Explorer to find the picture files that the .jpg files exist in C:\Users\Barb\Pictures. Is that correct? And if that's correct after running Chkdsk, does it correct the indexes so the files can be opened correctly?

Hope this helps and let us know......

Grif

Post was last edited on April 25, 2017 3:09 PM PDT

- Collapse -
I give up

All I know is what the pathway looks like. Ironically, when I took a screen shot of a sample picture/file name, it saved it and then told me it couldn't get to it when I tried to open it just now.

When I look at the properties for a particular picture it's: C:\Users\Barb\Pictures\2010-10-08(or other date)\picture name. The error message says: "Windows cannot find 'C:\Users\Barb\Pictures\2010-10-08\2010.10.08 012.jpg' So, it's stuck a date using periods in there, a space and the name of the jpg. It looks like it doesn't like the "2010-10-08". Maybe? I've tried moving some of the pictures to another folder off of C:\Users\Barb\Pictures, but that doesn't work, either.

I tried doing the chkdsk and it told me it would run it on restart, but when I restarted, it didn't do it. Twice.

It's a good thing I have most of my pictures backed up. I think Microsoft has won this one.

- Collapse -
Others Are Also Having The Chkdsk NOT Running Problem

Post was last edited on April 25, 2017 7:46 PM PDT

- Collapse -
One More Thing To Try... Think Corrupted Profile

If your current Windows logon/profile is corrupted, it also could be causing the picture issue. So... login as a different user with admin rights (if you don't already have a second admin login, create one NOW as it's critical to do so.) Once you've logged in to the new user login, you should be able access the picture files in your old user account by using File Explorer to access "C:\Users\oldusername\Pictures. If they open correctly from the new login, then you'll know the old login is a a corrupted profile. To rectify the situation, copy all your pictures and personal files and documents in to the new account and run the computer normally for a while. When you're comfortable everything is running correctly, delete the old account. If you do this, be sure to once again, create a second, backup admin account....

Hope this helps.

Grif

Post was last edited on April 25, 2017 8:03 PM PDT

- Collapse -
Genius!

Oh! I bet that'll do it! I don't have time tonight but I'll try it tomorrow. Thank you so much. It makes so much sense.

- Collapse -
It's all about the file associations

So, the solution to this problem was way easier than I thought. I'm amazed that I didn't think of it sooner. The update to Windows 10 Creator evidently left me with no default program to open .jpgs. I went in, changed the file associations and voila. I can view my pictures again. I should've known to think about simple solutions first. Never occurred to me that an update could get rid of them. Thanks for all the help, though.

- Collapse -
Strange, That's Usually A Different Error Messge

If there is no program associated with the file to be opened, you usually see an error saying something like: "This file has no program associate with it" and when you see it, you simply find the appropriate program to open the file. In your case, you saw a message that said: "File Not Found". Although you seemed to have fixed the issue, I'm not sure why you are seeing the error.

Good job and thanks for posting back.

Grif

- Collapse -
Chkdsk

Hi Guys,
Well come forum site.We just tried this. This is my account is the administrator account on this machine.We have run chkdsk before but this time it tells me that we need to run it in "elevated mode".

Thanks.

- Collapse -
I Described How To Do This Earlier In This Thread

As listed earlier:

In order to run an elevated command prompt as admin, do it this way: In the search line at the lower left, type in "command" and when it shows up at the top of the search window, RIGHT click on the "Command Prompt" listing, choose "Run as administrator" When the command line opens, type in chkdsk /f /r /x, leaving the appropriate spaces between the letters as shown, then press the Enter key. You should see a note that it can't be run till a restart is done, type "Y" for yes, then press the Enter key again. Close the command prompt and restart the computer. Chkdsk will run upon restart and will take quite a while to finish..

Hope this helps.

Grif

CNET Forums