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Wild Mustangs of the Badlands

by Rolway / November 16, 2006 8:53 AM PST

I saw this article in American Profile. Thought it interesting since I have spent most of my life in our one horse town of many breeds and thought it might interest some of our horsemen on here.

http://www.americanprofile.com/article/19760.html

It?s rugged country fit more for beast than man. In the remote South Dakota badlands, once sacred to American Indians who stalked buffalo on its plains, coyote howls echo off the walls of deep canyons?and 500 wild mustangs run free, thanks to former bronc rider, bullfighter, cattle rancher and rodeo photographer Dayton O. Hyde.

In the late 1980s, Hyde was driving through California on a trip to buy cattle when he passed a huge government holding pen where wild horses were corralled to protect federal land from excessive grazing. ?It made me so mad to see them sad-eyed and dejected that I decided to do something,? says Hyde, now 81.

In 1988, Hyde bought an 11,000-acre ranch near Hot Springs, S.D. (pop. 4,129), to take in and release captured mustangs. He created the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary to protect not just wild horses and the prairies, but also America?s equine heritage.

?These horses represent our Western history,? he says, ?and it?s important to keep this link with the past, to keep this old blood alive. Someday we will want to go back to the mustang to re-infuse their ?smarts? and hardiness into our domestic horses.?

It?s rugged country fit more for beast than man. In the remote South Dakota badlands, once sacred to American Indians who stalked buffalo on its plains, coyote howls echo off the walls of deep canyons?and 500 wild mustangs run free, thanks to former bronc rider, bullfighter, cattle rancher and rodeo photographer Dayton O. Hyde.

In the late 1980s, Hyde was driving through California on a trip to buy cattle when he passed a huge government holding pen where wild horses were corralled to protect federal land from excessive grazing. ?It made me so mad to see them sad-eyed and dejected that I decided to do something,? says Hyde, now 81.

In 1988, Hyde bought an 11,000-acre ranch near Hot Springs, S.D. (pop. 4,129), to take in and release captured mustangs. He created the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary to protect not just wild horses and the prairies, but also America?s equine heritage.

?These horses represent our Western history,? he says, ?and it?s important to keep this link with the past, to keep this old blood alive. Someday we will want to go back to the mustang to re-infuse their ?smarts? and hardiness into our domestic horses.?

Here is another link to these fabulous Mustangs:
http://www.wildmustangs.com/

George

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Thank you George
by Glenda / November 16, 2006 9:03 AM PST

one of my favorite movies is Hidalgo:) That horse was amazing:)

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Hi Glenda..
by Rolway / November 16, 2006 9:46 AM PST
In reply to: Thank you George

I have never seen that Movie. Someday maybe.

Funny, I saw this article yesterday and thought to myself, whats happening to this town? Not too long ago there were more Cows and Horses in this town than people. Well, almost anyway. We still have the two riding academies, but the farms are all gone. All Condos, Townhouses and million dollar homes. Theres another good article in one of those issues. "The Forgotten War" (Korea)

George

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same out here
by Glenda / November 16, 2006 10:00 AM PST
In reply to: Hi Glenda..

The West is NOT the West anymore:( You have to go to the really small towns to even see horses and cattle! We used to have a riding stable in AJ but that has been gone for years

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I remember Hot Springs. They have a large, enclosed swimming
by Kiddpeat / November 16, 2006 12:41 PM PST

area there which is, of course, the hot springs. That was a lot of fun. We had been visiting a distant cousin who lived in Martin SD, and happened to stop in Hot Springs for the night. I don't think we knew about any mustangs in the area.

My g-grandparents are buried in Kimball SD.

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I think you all would like this
by WOODS-HICK / November 16, 2006 2:49 PM PST
CLOUD: WILD STALLION OF THE ROCKIES.



America's wild horses lead an exhilarating but perilous existence. The climate can be brutal, mountain lions and other predators stalk the young, and their dependence on public grazing lands for sustenance often puts them in competition with livestock interests. In some places where these magnificent animals roam, it is not unusual for a wild horse to fall victim to an illegal horse shooter.

Against this backdrop, NATURE presents Cloud's story. Filmed in the mountains of Montana, this poignant, engrossing chronicle focuses on an extraordinary stallion, whose life has been recorded since his birth in the wild in 1995 by Emmy-winning filmmaker Ginger Kathrens.

we saw it last spring, try to see it, beautiful story
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(NT) I saw some of it, Really good:)
by Glenda / November 16, 2006 3:53 PM PST
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Yes, it was very interesting. Thanks.
by Rolway / November 16, 2006 10:56 PM PST

The story about the Cloud project, as you said, was very good. I also liked the Photo Essay, especially #7.

George

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