HolidayBuyer's Guide

The CNET Lounge forum

General discussion

Why Canadians Aren't Downloading Music

by akumukun / October 26, 2006 3:12 AM PDT

Hey guys

This comes from the topic from the Oct. 25 episode of Buzz Out Loud, the story showing that Canadians are downloading less music.

As a Canadian, here's what I think are the reasons:

1) Less Canadians willing to admit that they are because of paranoia of being sued

2) Since almost all Canadian ISPs are packet shaping against things like BitTorrent(Net Neutrality is long dead in Canada...), many people have taken to using a torrent client that can encrypt their traffic, making it almost impossible to track what's being downloaded

3) Popular music coming out of the North American music industries has been getting progressively worse

4) Increased availability of inexpensive flash drives and external hard drives make it easier to get music from a friend's collection instead of downloading

5) LAN events are very popular, as more computers in one place means more heat generated. Hey! It's cold up here!

So that's my thoughts. Anyone think any different?

Discussion is locked
You are posting a reply to: Why Canadians Aren't Downloading Music
The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Please refer to our CNET Forums policies for details. All submitted content is subject to our Terms of Use.
Track this discussion and email me when there are updates

If you're asking for technical help, please be sure to include all your system info, including operating system, model number, and any other specifics related to the problem. Also please exercise your best judgment when posting in the forums--revealing personal information such as your e-mail address, telephone number, and address is not recommended.

You are reporting the following post: Why Canadians Aren't Downloading Music
This post has been flagged and will be reviewed by our staff. Thank you for helping us maintain CNET's great community.
Sorry, there was a problem flagging this post. Please try again now or at a later time.
If you believe this post is offensive or violates the CNET Forums' Usage policies, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the post). Once reported, our moderators will be notified and the post will be reviewed.
Collapse -
Its probably more to do with ease of purchase and age.
by ellis feigenbaum / October 26, 2006 5:00 AM PDT

Its probably more to do with ease of purchase and age.
this may sound a little odd but the mass market for music purchases is teenagers till mid 20`s, thats notto say that persons over the age of 25 stop buying or listening to music they just buy less than the 15-25 demographic.
given that the massive online libraries of free music have all been closed down and that to download most music you either need some type of client or to give your details to an online source its pretty obvious that the RIAA will have had some large effect on the way people aquirre music.
Iam sure that the 14% who do download illegally are mostly under the age of independent income.k12 to students once passed the income barrier they give it up, basic math would suggest 99 cents to download a legal song is cheaper than a possible 3000 dollar fine or a long law suit.
what would be a far more interesting statistic - is how many people are making illegal copies of rented videos and handing them out as gifts to family and freinds, rent a disc for 3 bucks copy and burn 5 for 50 cents a peice a buck with the dvd case and copied jacket if you have a lightscribe burner or the right printer you can do a really pro looking job nice gifts for xmas and all for under 10 bucks the lot as oppesed to say 75-125 for going out to buy the 5 discs.

Collapse -
Depends on what you look at.
by Owyn / October 26, 2006 6:27 AM PDT

"On Friday June 2, 2006, the CBC Radio 3 Podcast celebrates its first anniversary, 2 million downloads and its status as the #1 music podcast in Canada with a very special birthday edition of the show."

http://www.cbcradio3.com/

If you estimate 8 songs per episode, then that is over 16,000,000 downloads in the first year.

And that does not even count the streaming music with User Configurable Playlists.

Check out the site if you want to see how public broadcasting, podsafe music and enthusiasm can really interesect. One of the best sites out there. And the best answer possible to "probably no good music in Canada".

Collapse -
Flawed research?
by death2spam / October 26, 2006 6:47 AM PDT

Where did these statistics come from? I'm a geezer living in Nova Scotia and working at a local University, and between myself, co-workers and students, we download a sh*tload of music, video and other assorted media. Everyone I know across this huge, but sparsely populated land is pretty much ditto. So again, where did these numbers come from?

Collapse -
Lies, damn lies, and statistics.
by Owyn / October 26, 2006 6:52 AM PDT
In reply to: Flawed research?
Collapse -
(NT) (NT) Legal downloads, of course...........?
by MarkFlax Forum moderator / October 26, 2006 7:58 AM PDT
In reply to: Flawed research?
Collapse -
Comment
by bozeman / October 27, 2006 1:34 AM PDT

Hey guys

1) Less Canadians willing to admit that they are because of paranoia of being sued

I can agree with this one, depending on how they gathered the info though, but as an individual, most people think they are small potatoes and will comment anyway
------------

2) Since almost all Canadian ISPs are packet shaping against things like BitTorrent(Net Neutrality is long dead in Canada...), many people have taken to using a torrent client that can encrypt their traffic, making it almost impossible to track what's being downloaded

Maybe I'm just old, I keep saying that, but being in 30s isn't old =)

Most of my friends use bittorrent clients, but no one is downloading music from it, maybe something here or there, but rarely
--------

3) Popular music coming out of the North American music industries has been getting progressively worse

OK, you hit the nail on the head. Same with Hollywood, movies and music is just garbage, and it's been happening since the 90s. There is less and less good music out there and the quality overall has just gone down. Maybe I'm turning into my dad saying, they don't make music like they used to, but all the catering to the generation Y has left me with a bad taste in my mouth. If I hear another 8beat loop with bass underline I'm going to snap. Does anyone know how to actually write music anymore?

I never believed in anyone that performs and doesn't write their own music.
----------

4) Increased availability of inexpensive flash drives and external hard drives make it easier to get music from a friend's collection instead of downloading

yup, it does. I carry about 120 gig around me on my person between my Archos, portable drives, flash drives and other devices. My buddy runs a large music article syndicated in 3,000 newspapers in North America. He gets screeners for movies, tonnes of albums, mp3s from everyone. I was just at his place and he had several gig in a directory called top 300 songs of the last 30 years.

5) LAN events are very popular, as more computers in one place means more heat generated. Hey! It's cold up here!

So that's my thoughts. Anyone think any different?
---------------
-8C when I woke up, +8C when I go home, no snow yet, hope it comes soon, I got skiis waiting =)

I buy music when I feel its worth it. I'll download it and listen to it, and if I listen to it more then once, I'll give the artist their $1. I'm a developer, it's my job to write code all day and would be pretty bummed if people were just taking my stuff and using it. Ok, so I've released freeware and worked on Open Source, but if I sold something, or people used my stuff at work illegally, I would be bummed. I buy my Mike Oldfield, Cars, Enya, Sarah Maclachlan and more. I also try to support indie bands that regularly show up in bars and play shows, trying to make a living for themselves.

I think Canadians are still buying music, but seriously, alot of it is garbage. Alot of it is Indie bands I'm sure are not being tracked.

Collapse -
Maybe we're downloading legally?
by Thunderbuck / October 27, 2006 7:25 AM PDT

Not impossible that Canadians are more likely to sign up for the legit downloading subscriptions.

Sure, I downloaded tons of stuff "back in the day" (ie before Napster shut down). I tried other p2p clients, but eventually gave up when I found that much of the material available was virus-laden.

As well, I frequently found users on the Gnutella networks who wouldn't allow their systems to upload to other users.

P2P just became a big pain at that point. I subscribed to Napster as soon as it became available in Canada, and I've been reasonably happy with it (especially since FP4WM... I didn't say that aloud, did I?).

I have not drunk the iPod koolade yet. First, because I actually prefer the Plays For Sure subscription model. Second, because Apple has not yet arranged licensing for the television/film programming in Canada, it's far a far less compelling proposition here than it is in the US.

Popular Forums
icon
Computer Newbies 10,686 discussions
icon
Computer Help 54,365 discussions
icon
Laptops 21,181 discussions
icon
Networking & Wireless 16,313 discussions
icon
Phones 17,137 discussions
icon
Security 31,287 discussions
icon
TVs & Home Theaters 22,101 discussions
icon
Windows 7 8,164 discussions
icon
Windows 10 2,657 discussions

The Samsung RF23M8090SG

One of the best French door fridges we've tested

A good-looking fridge with useful features like an auto-filling water pitcher and a temperature-adjustable "FlexZone" drawer. It was a near-flawless performer in our cooling tests.