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Which is the official language in the US?

by Charlie Thunell PL&T / August 15, 2004 3:05 PM PDT

According to the constitution, which is the official language of the USA? I am not 100% sure, but if I recall correctly there is no language specified...
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Re: Which is the official language in the US?
by Roger NC / August 15, 2004 5:09 PM PDT

And every time it is brought up to establish English (the most common still), some one starts yelling it's discriminatory and therefore we can't do it.

And I beliveve you knew, and are just hoping for someone to start a vindictive thread about it.

Hmm, guess I sort of fell for the bait then. Oh well.


RogerNC

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com

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Yes, that is his aim.
by Edward ODaniel / August 16, 2004 4:12 AM PDT

It should be noted that ALL official documents from the Declaration of Independance through the legislation, regulations, executive orders, treaties, federal court rulings, and all other official pronouncements of the present are officially composed and archived in ENGLISH.

One such is H.R. 856 ? The United States-Puerto Rico Political Status Act, 1997 which states in part:

SEC. 3. POLICY
...
(b) OFFICIAL LANGUAGE- It is the policy of the Congress that English shall be the common language of mutual understanding in the United States, and that this policy shall apply in all of the States duly and freely admitted to the Union. The Congress recognizes that at the present time, Spanish and English are the joint official languages of Puerto Rico, and have been for nearly 100 years; that English is the official language of Federal courts in Puerto Rico; that the ability to speak English is a requirement for Federal jury services; yet Spanish rather than English is currently the predominant language used by the majority of the people of Puerto Rico; and that Congress has the authority to expand existing English language requirements in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. In the event that the referenda held under this Act result in approval of sovereignty leading to Statehood, it is anticipated that upon accession to Statehood, English would become the official language of the Federal Government in Puerto Rico to the same extent as Federal law then requires throughout the United States. Congress also recognizes the significant advantage that proficiency in Spanish as well as English has bestowed on the people of Puerto Rico, and further that this will serve the best interests of both Puerto Rico and the rest of the United States in our mutual dealings in the Caribbean, Latin America, and throughout the Spanish-speaking world.



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(NT) (NT) Thanks Ed, had not read that before
by John Robie / August 16, 2004 5:39 AM PDT
In reply to: Yes, that is his aim.
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Re: Yes, that is his aim.
by Roger NC / August 17, 2004 6:59 AM PDT
In reply to: Yes, that is his aim.
It is the policy of the Congress that English shall be the common language of mutual understanding in the United States, and that this policy shall apply in all of the States duly and freely admitted to the Union.

How far does this go to making English an official language? could some over zealous lawyer (a reverse role for the ACLU perhaps?) sue using this to stop expenses in providing multiple language translations of official documents?

Actually having translations of government documents is a good thing, but it should be recognized as a consideration and a service, not as an absolute requirement.

Afterall, no one provides for any language spoken, not even upon request.

RogerNC

click here to email semods4@yahoo.com
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Sure they could...
by Edward ODaniel / August 17, 2004 8:40 AM PDT

and with the right judges they would win. Then they would need to get it in front of sane judges on appeal too.

Precedent is important but not necessarily legally binding.

Every time a simple Bill comes up to make it official it fails for one reason or another, but English is the Official language of government whether stated or not.

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