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which distribution and how to migrate

by nerdological / September 6, 2010 7:01 PM PDT

I'm a Windows XP user thinking of migrating to Linux. I took the distribution chooser at zegeniestudios.net and got Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Mandriva and OpenSUSE (yes, I'm dumb as a brick when it comes to computers), but I still don't know which one to choose. How are they different from each other?

For my part, I'd especially prefer something that can run Wine, just in case it's not compatible with some of the above. Security is very, very important to me, having been traumatized by viruses and other malware through the years. And I mainly use my computer (EeePC laptop) for watching video files and writing, if that's going to be important.

I read somewhere that Windows and Linux aren't compatible, and that you have to store your files somewhere and put them back after you've installed the OS. But a lot of my files are Word and Excel documents - how will I be able to open those in a Linux? Or is Wine going to take care of that? Any additional security programs to download? Any other tips?

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Open Office
by R_Head / September 7, 2010 11:24 AM PDT

Try Open Office. Is a Windows and Linux Office Application. I use it all the time and does works like a charm.

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Forgot to mention...
by R_Head / September 7, 2010 11:27 AM PDT

Most of Linux spin offs has it already installed.

Mandriva, SuSE, Fedora, Ubuntu/Kubuntu, etc...

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Thanks!
by nerdological / September 12, 2010 3:25 PM PDT
In reply to: Forgot to mention...

Thanks! That's good to hear.

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answers
by GODhack / September 7, 2010 9:33 PM PDT

>How are they different from each other?
http://distrowatch.com/ - can answer to this question.
Really differences are small just program management and graphical art are probably main differences. Also there are political differences on ex Novel behind openSUSE has relations with M$ not everyone like this.

Everything can run wine, but then it comes to extremely hight security standards on Linux using wine is considered as security decrease.

Main security programs on Linux are iptables and selinux. First is just advanced firewall other is advanced stuff developed by CIA! Happy It should secure you well. Bet hell yes it will complain even about wine start as about security issue. Little bit maniacal.

>I read somewhere that Windows and Linux aren't compatible, and that you have to store your files somewhere and put them back after you've installed the OS.
Windows is not able to open Linux partition, but Linux opens everything well.
Windows is not Linux compatible, but Linux is windows compatible in other words.

>Any other tips?
Just download *.iso files burn them to cd and restart PC.
Linux works even without install just from CD/DVD/USBkey! Trying Linux out is simple and the best way to learn about it. Wink

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Wow!
by nerdological / September 12, 2010 3:20 PM PDT
In reply to: answers

Thanks!

<i>Main security programs on Linux are iptables and selinux. First is just advanced firewall other is advanced stuff developed by CIA!</i>

THE CIA? Cool! I gotta try selinux just to see that, but I read somewhere that Ubuntu, the distro I was going to try (first?), uses another security program. So, can they both run on Ubuntu, Linux Mint, open SUSE and Mandriva?

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laptop and external hard drive compatibility
by nerdological / September 12, 2010 3:28 PM PDT
In reply to: Wow!

>Just download *.iso files burn them to cd and restart PC.
Linux works even without install just from CD/DVD/USBkey! Trying Linux out is simple and the best way to learn about it.

No need to uninstall Windows? You can have both a Linux and a Windows OS in a laptop if you want to?

By the way, the laptop I'm going to install Linux on is an EeePC, and my external hard drive is a Seagate Expansion. They don't indicate whether they're Linux-compatible. Are they?

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answers
by GODhack / September 12, 2010 6:35 PM PDT

>No need to uninstall Windows?
Yes. even after Linux install you can have Linux and windows in same computer. No matter laptop or PC.

>They don't indicate whether they're Linux-compatible. Are they?
I am not 100% sure, but it should work.

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Distro Chooser
by wksa / September 9, 2010 1:21 AM PDT
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Distro
by joedoozer / September 11, 2010 12:14 PM PDT
In reply to: Distro Chooser

That is a pretty cool link on choosing a distro.

My laptop crashed running Vista almost a year ago. I had nothing but a blank screen and a cursor. I loaded a live CD of Linux Mint 8, and booted from the disc. I was up and running off the CD in minutes. Everything on my laptop worked, it noticed my printer automatically and I was surfing the internet without any configuration. All without even installing it.

I was a Linux newbie, and still struggle with installing anything that isn't in the package/software manager. Short story long......I love Linux Mint, and I will never pay for an operating system again. By far the fastest, most stable thing I have ever used.

Whatever you choose, try a Live CD first. Make sure all your stuff works. Cameras, webcams, printers, scanners or whatever. Run it off the Live CD and make sure everything you do on your computer.....works.

And then forget PC :).

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Wish Everything Ran On Linux
by 323online / September 20, 2010 7:18 AM PDT
In reply to: Distro

I installed Linux on a separate partition and set my PC to dual boot but there's still so much software that doesn't run on Linux platforms. With all the creative and marketing tools I use I'd be seriously handicapped with a Linux OS. I really hate living under the Windows reign of terror and licking Bill Gates boots but for now I'm forced to embrace the horror.

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In Linux
by R_Head / September 23, 2010 2:12 AM PDT

There are tons of software that can do the same as MS Applications. They are usually named differently due to copyright red tape. Search on the web for some that is similar. Some programs are as good or better and some no so good.

For example, I use Thunderbird as a Mail Client, just as good as Outlook or KMail (KMail is more integrated to KDE and has a look and feel like Outlook).

Open Source Developers have a strange way to name their apps, so do not be afraid of running a medial player called Kafeine or Rosegarden or Amarok or a DVD Ripper called K9Copy.

What Linux does not have is the Vendor Support. MS does not write most of the Applications, the Vendors writes them. Some does support Linux and they work just the same as the MS counterparts. One good example is Mozilla foundation software.

I hope this helps.

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