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Question

When I upgraded to 8.1 I lost my key for 8

by menother / February 22, 2014 11:21 PM PST

I have a Sony Vaio SVE14135CXB which shipped with Windows 8. I no longer have my original recovery media. When Windows 8.1 came out, I was prompted every time I restarted my computer to upgrade until I did. This was a horrible mistake. The Sony drivers got screwed up, and I'm now being told I was only supposed to upgrade the special VAIO way- even though my computer only showed me that notification AFTER I had already upgraded. Not only that, but the only way I can revert to 8 is through the original recovery media- which I no longer have- because by upgrading to 8.1, my key was changed to an 8.1 key, and it will not work for windows 8 (It's not written on the bottom of my computer).

So my question is: If I were to download an unactivated version of 8, install all the Sony drivers on it, and then do the PROPER upgrade like they keep telling me I should have done (Seriously, HOW WAS I SUPPOSED TO KNOW THAT?) and then enter my current key, would that work? I would have the additional advantage of not having a whole bunch of sony bloatware, but I'm not sure if this would work/would it even accept my key? Can you upgrade an unactivated version?

Thank you for any help/thoughts you can provide.

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All Answers

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Answer
That key was unuseful as
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 22, 2014 11:31 PM PST

It's nothing more than an OEM key or again, pre-activated. Why did I write "again?" The OEM pre-installed OS discussion is rather well done.

And I'm going with no. Microsoft's license system has improved and doesn't seem to work as you wish.

I advise you save your files on the usual backups then restore the Sony and try again.
Bob

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I can't restore, thats the issue
by menother / February 23, 2014 2:01 AM PST

So if I want to restore it to Windows 8, I'm going to have to fork over the 75$ for recovery media from sony? Without it, it seems I can only do a full restore to 8.1, which defeats the point.

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I didn't have to.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 23, 2014 2:12 AM PST

I made the recovery media (and a spare copy) as I set up my nee machines. This way I'm all set.

Your posts make me guess you are learning about this the usual way. Sony in the past has always been pretty strict about limited support for anything other than the supplied OS. And it appears that an OS upgrade follows their past thoughts on that.

Microsoft on the other hand has yet to accept that folk no longer want to do driver hunts. Apple figured that out long ago.
Bob

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Yeah, I'm kicking myself
by menother / February 23, 2014 10:19 AM PST
In reply to: I didn't have to.

I didn't make back-up back-ups, and the ones I did make met an unhappy demise. The kicker is that this didn't actually start when I upgraded to 8.1, it was about 2 months later. I did a windows update and my keyboard backlight started acting all wonky- it WONT TURN OFF. Which may not seem like a big deal but it eats my battery and drives me bonkers in the dark.

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Some but not all repairs.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / February 23, 2014 1:22 PM PST
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Couple of quick thoughts
by Zouch / February 28, 2014 6:28 PM PST

When you say it was working for a couple of months on 8.1 before a later Windows upgrade, do you mean completely correctly?

If so, then have you tried backing off the later patches that screwed it up? If that gets it back to working properly you can then research how to get this patch on cleanly (Sony User Fora, maybe).

Second option might be to search the Sony site or again, ask the fora, for a driver for your keyboard driver compatible with Windows 8.1.

Failing that, I agree with Bob's earlier comment, only the Sony OEM Win8 install disk will fix it. I once tried a similar approach to that you described using a standard Windows disk to upgrade a Samsung from Home to Professional - never got it to work in a stable fashion. Reinstalled the Samsung OEM disk and never a hint of a problem. I don't know about Sony but some years ago, Dell OEM disks were all physically the same - they built a Windows Product Key from the hardware in the machine. If Sony are the same, you may only need to borrow an OEM install disk. DO NOT copy the disk, that violates the EULA - if it works, after install, make two full image backups!

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Go ahead and violate that EULA.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / March 1, 2014 12:09 AM PST

If you have a Sony and duplicate the Sony OEM disk, who's to write/say/indict that your copy isn't from your lost copy?
Bob

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Answer
Does the machine have a recovery partition??
by WakkoWarner / February 28, 2014 12:10 PM PST

If it has a recovery partition, you should be able to use one of the function keys to get into the Sony recovery system at boot. Once you are there, you should be able to restore it to the factory load without any recovery discs. Mind you, this will only work if it indeed has a recovery partition on the hard drive.

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It can't be done
by dragonmizer / February 28, 2014 12:38 PM PST

Once windows 8 has been upgraded to 8.1 you cannot use a recovery disk for windows 8.It won't work.It looks for the windows 8 key & finds the windows 8.1 instead.Therefore the recovery will fail.thats why you always make system images before & after upgrades.

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Well it depends how it was updated to 8.1
by orlbuckeye / March 4, 2014 3:03 AM PST
In reply to: It can't be done

If the pc is purchased with Windows 8.0 (OEM) the Key will be on a sticker on the PC. MS wanted to force Windows 8.0 users to upgrade using the store(FOR FREE). Upgrading this way doesn't change the Windows 8 key when you upgrade to 8.1. But if you really want to pay for the Windows 8.1 upgrade you can and it's available as a download ISO file or purchasing the retail version and do a clean install. The Windows 8 key WON"T work with the ISO or the retail packaged version of 8.1.


http://www.askvg.com/fix-windows-8-genuine-product-key-doesn't-work-for-windows-8-1-clean-installation/

So if this is a computer purchased with Windows 8.0 installed and upgraded using the Microsoft store the Windows 8.0 key will work. In that case you would stick the restore to factory disks in the drive then do all the updates and the Windows 8.1 upgrade will appear in the Windows store.

First check the Sony website for your model and see if the drivers have been updated.

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