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What should I do before and after I install a new CPU?

by wicksey / December 19, 2006 9:20 AM PST

I have a celeron 2.67 GHz on my motherboard and I was planning on upgrading that to a P4 with a new heatsink on a LGA 775 socket. Is there any kind of recommendated steps I should take before and after I upgrade the processor?

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Only 1 thing. Watts.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 19, 2006 10:53 AM PST

Let's see if we can find the Watts for your Celeron and then I'll look for Watts on the typical P4 socket 775.

From http://balusc.xs4all.nl/srv/har-cpu-int-p4.php I get 84 Watts peak for the Celeron.

The socket 775 P4's wiegh in from 84 to 115 Watts but hit some high amperages.

You should be fine if you have no power issues today and haven't added much to the base machine. A new heatsink system is almost a given.

Hope this helps. Also make sure your board BIOS supports the new CPU.

Bob

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REPLY
by Marco3848 / December 19, 2006 7:57 PM PST

do a search on google found alot oF GOOD HARDWARE
REVIEW SITES WITH PICTURES AND A TIP USE Isopropyl alcohol (70%) swabs THERE CHEAP AT A DRUGSTORE OR SUPERMARKET TO CLEAN ANYTHING LIKE EXTRA THEWRMAL PASTE THAT MIGHT BE SQUEEZED OUT OF THE CPU ONTO THE
CIRCUITS SOME THERMAL PASTE IS CONDUCTIVE YOUR NEW CPU IF RETAIL SHOULD COME WITH A THERMAL PAD THOUGH
GOOD LUCK AND DON'T FOURCE IT JUST GENTLE LET IT FALL IN PLACE CORNER LINED UP MAKE SURE ITS FLAT
ON BASESO YOU DON'T BEND THE PINS IT'S SIMPLE TAKE YOUR TIME

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EDIT SEARCH GOOGLE "installing a cpu"
by Marco3848 / December 19, 2006 8:00 PM PST
In reply to: REPLY

EDIT SEARCH GOOGLE "installing a cpu"

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Your reply is unreadable.
by R. Proffitt Forum moderator / December 19, 2006 10:26 PM PST

Almost all capital letters (considered shouting), little punctuation and one paragraph.

Is this how you want responses?

Bob

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Reply to What should I do before and after I install a new C
by aliensquirl / December 22, 2006 5:05 AM PST
In reply to: REPLY

marco, until you get your period key repaired I think you should restrain yourself from posting online.

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Just make sure the new CPU is compatible
by VAPCMD / December 20, 2006 1:53 AM PST

with the underlying system. For example...the CPU will install in the socket but will the current MB BIOS recognize it properly ?

You didn't give any system specs, indicate use of the PC, or indicate reason for the upgrade so I'll also suggest the possibility of adding RAM as another consideration for increasing system performance. Adding a more robust processor to a RAM starved system won't give much of performance boost.

VAPCMD

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Got it!
by wicksey / December 20, 2006 4:03 PM PST

Thank you every one for helping. Your info is more than plenty.

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(NT) Please keep us posted on how it works..
by VAPCMD / December 21, 2006 2:30 AM PST
In reply to: Got it!
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CPU installed on OEM PC's../
by castingRod47 / December 21, 2006 11:53 PM PST

If you have a PC made by an OEM I would NOT change the CPU..
I would build a new PC from scratch instead..
Yes...there are Motherboards that will operate useing a CELERON D or a Pentium 4....
..the issue of compatibility is your highest priority..
..The Processor Upgrade can have flaws from the change-over..
..Your PC needs to have been a great running PC to start with..
You can not UPGRADE a lousy running PC..
..I have found the Intel Website really great for building a PC..
along the way I have also found that its wise to NOT mess w/a PC you purchased from a Store.

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Good thing its not OEM
by wicksey / December 22, 2006 4:03 AM PST

Well, the motherboard is Intel D101GGC. I looked it up on intel and I found that it does support the P4 and even Pd. I probably going to get the pentium D for sure but not just yet. Well, i looked at the BIOS and it seems to be compatible if I changed the processor to Pd. Is there anything else I need to be concern about? Oh yeah, I am probably going to get a new heatsink if I plan on getting the pentium D.

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reply to: Good thing its not OEM
by vixenk / December 22, 2006 4:54 AM PST
In reply to: Good thing its not OEM

If you get a new heatsink, don't only worry about whether or not it's compatible with your socket but also pay attention to what processor line it is recommended for.

Make sure that when changing out the cpu and heatsink that you at least lay your case on its side, if not taking the motherboard out completely.

I don't know how long your current cpu has gone without having the heatsink being removed, but there is a chance that it will be slightly difficult to remove the heatsink after unlatching it due to the thermal paste having thickened and 'glued' the heatsink and cpu together. If this happens, don't twist - this can result in breaking or bending a pin on your old cpu. You also don't want to jerk or put a lot of strength into it. Just gently work on pulling it loose (pulling straight up) with a *very* slight rocking motion. The goal here is to pull the heatsink off as straight as possible so that if the cpu comes out of socket with it no damage will be done to the cpu's pins.

Also, if your heatsink or cpu don't come with any form of thermal paste/thermal pad, you may need to invest in a small tube of thermal paste. Don't place the heatsink on the cpu without thermal paste or a thermal pad - this is very important.

Whenever applying thermal paste, it just takes a small grain of rice sized bit in the middle of the cpu. Once you place the heatsink on the thermal paste will begin to spread and thin out to cover the entire cpu.

As for a thermal pad, there may be a form of protective covering on it for you to remove (thin plastic film and the like).

And that's pretty much all I can think of that one would need to be concerned about. Happy

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I keep that in mind
by wicksey / December 22, 2006 12:34 PM PST

Thanks for the info. The motherboard, cpu, and heatsink have only been there for 3 months. It might be sticky but I will see about it. Thanks again. I will definitely keep this in mind when I am changing the heatsink.

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What should i do before and after i install a new Cpu
by jaconnah / December 25, 2006 1:07 AM PST

Need to know a few things-- is your current motherboard AGP,PCI or PCI xpress compliant-(pent4 works best with PCI Xpress-normall PCI will do).Upgrade Bios software, and chipset software. Is your current memory ddr2 or ddr1? (from memory you chould have a PCI compliant board cus they were desighned for pent4's and celerons, just not sure of age.)Pent4 runs off ddr2 memory. But remember Pentium4 old now and so is the PCI express, to progress to a more powerful Cpu after ur pent4 upgrade you would require a new mother board/Graphics card/ and power supply

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New CPU but what about RAM?
by colinmc2 / February 22, 2007 2:42 AM PST

Hello,
I just joined this forum hoping to find some advice on computer hardware, I've learned a little bit over the last few weeks as I want to upgrade my pc.
After alot of research I have bought a p4 3.0GHz processor, The reason I want to upgrade is because I use a program to convert video files to wmv format and it uses 100% of my cpu.
My current cpu is a celeron D 2.4GHz and I have 512MB of RAM, My question is (1st question, I'm sure more will follow!)Do I need to upgrade my RAM? Does this sort of program require RAM aswell as CPU power? My system supports dual channel memory (i think thats what its called)and at the moment I have a hynix DIMM 512MB and i'm not sure whether I need extra RAM to support the new p4 I will be installing...Probably tomorrow (my b'day)
I would really appreciate anyones advice, most of the forums I have asked so far seem reluctant to offer advice on my situation.
Don't worry about rambling on the more info the merrier. Thanks.

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