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What's the difference between coax & fiber optic cables?

by ronnie771 / February 24, 2005 7:48 AM PST

I own a Logitech Z-5500 speaker system. I would like to add a digital cable to the system, but am confused between the two cables. What's the difference, if any? HELP!!

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by 3luke3 / February 24, 2005 10:41 PM PST

Both digital cables send the same type of signal (& I would recomend either one to anybody because digital is the way to go). the coax does it with electricity (electrons, voltage, pulses of current if you will) & the fiber-optics cable does it with optics (with light, or photons). If you can keep the digital cable relatively free from sharp bends & too much winding... then go ahead go with the optics cable, it will be virtually untouchable by electromagnetic noise that may be around your components. If it will be wound quite a bit or have to round a few corners... then go with the coax cable, it isn't affected as much by the bending. If you wanna know why, I'll reply again.

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Optical cables
by bogie1 / February 25, 2005 6:15 AM PST
In reply to: ok...

Do you think 30 ft is too far for optical?

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by 3luke3 / February 25, 2005 6:53 AM PST
In reply to: Optical cables

I've never tried it, but I would think that it should work. even though the RMS strength of the light signal probably drops a tad bit over 30ft (compared to 6ft), it is still a digital signal and its impervious to EM interference (because its optical).

In a nutshell, I have no practical experience to say "yes it works", but if you can find such a cable... you should try it & post what components you used with it & whether or not it worked. With digital... its very hard to get degraded performance... so usually either it works or it doesn't.

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Optic cable lenth
by pjazz / March 1, 2005 2:06 PM PST
In reply to: hmm...

I have the logitech 680 and use the Optic cable. I haven't used the coax, but compared to the anolog input the sound is night and day. I don't think distance is an issue with fiber just remember it's basically glass inside the cable, so you can curve it around corners but not bend it.

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by acebreathe / March 1, 2005 3:32 PM PST
In reply to: Optic cable lenth

The main difference bewtween the two is the way they connect to the receiver. The coaxial fits securely on the input jack and is more like a standard analog cable, and is probably better for a longer run. An optical cable can distort sound with just a slight kink in the cable. They both produce excellent sound.

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